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Quinta, Rolly wipe out P4.6 billion in agricultural goods

Around P4.6 billion worth of agricultural goods were damaged by Typhoon Quinta (Molave) and Super Typhoon Rolly (Goni), initial data from the Department of Agriculture (DA) showed.

Quinta wiped out 145,577 metric tons of agricultural goods worth P2.56 billion. Almost 50,000 farmers and fisherfolk were affected.

The typhoon made landfall in Albay twice, then in Quezon, Marinduque, and Oriental Mindoro, from October 25 to 26.

Assessment for damage caused by Rolly is still ongoing, but initial surveys showed that it damaged 116,962 metric tons of goods worth almost P2 billion.

DA Director Roy Abaya said on Tuesday, November 3, that the cost of damage due to Rolly is likely much higher, as areas like Bicol have yet to give updated figures.

Rolly is also the world's strongest tropical cyclone for 2020 yet, tearing through Bicol and Calabarzon last Sunday, November 1.

The total agricultural losses, so far, will have minimal impact on consumers, as the damaged rice account for only around 1% of total national requirements.

Abaya noted that some goods worth P24.6 billion were saved, as they were harvested ahead of the powerful tropical cyclones.

Abaya said farmers covered by insurance from the Philippine Crop Insurance Corporation can claim up to P15,000.

Farmers can also apply for zero-interest loans worth P25,000 from the Agricultural Credit Policy Council. – Rappler.com

Ralf Rivas

A sociologist by heart, a journalist by profession. Ralf is Rappler's business reporter, covering macroeconomy, government finance, companies, and agriculture.

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