Provide your email for confirmation

Tell us a bit about yourself

country *

Please provide your email address

welcome to Rappler

Login

To share your thoughts

Don't have an account?

Login with email

Check your inbox

We just sent a link to your inbox. Click the link to continue signing in. Can’t find it? Check your spam & junk mail.

Didn't get a link?

Use password?

Login with email

Reset password?

Please use the email you used to register and we will send you a link to reset your password

Check your inbox

We just sent a link to your inbox. Click the link to continue resetting your password. Can’t find it? Check your spam & junk mail.

Didn't get a link?

Sign up

Ready to get started

Already have an account?

Sign up with email

By signing up you agree to Rappler’s Terms and Conditions and Privacy

Check your inbox

We just sent a link to your inbox. Click the link to continue registering. Can’t find it? Check your spam & junk mail.

Didn't get a link?

Join Rappler+

Join Move

How often would you like to pay?

Annual Subscription

Monthly Subscription

Your payment was interrupted

Exiting the registration flow at this point will mean you will loose your progress

Your payment didn’t go through

Exiting the registration flow at this point will mean you will loose your progress

welcome to Rappler+

welcome to Move

welcome to Move & Rappler+

‘Perpetual chaos’ if revolutionary gov’t pushed – business group

One of the Philippines’ oldest business groups sounded the alarm on proposals for a revolutionary government, warning that this would result in “perpetual chaos and poverty.”

The Chamber of Commerce of the Philippine Islands (CCPI) said in a statement that government must uphold the Constitution and laws “faithfully according to their spirit, intent and honest common sense; not twisted logic, not deviant interpretation.” (READ: LOOK BACK: Campaigns to set up a revolutionary gov't in the Philippines)

Revolutionary government advocates want the country to shift to a federal form of government.

CCPI notedthat out of the 193 members of the United Nations, there are only 28 countries with federal forms of government.

“It does not really matter what system, whether unitary or federal or versions thereof – what is important is the actual practice of good governance. There is good and bad governance in either form, but the vast majority of countries have chosen unitary systems,” CCPI said.

The statement was signed by CCPI president Jose Luis Yulo Jr and executive director Jose Fernando Alcantara.

CCPI also noted that the Philippines, a nation composed of thousands of islands, is already “dispersed geographically,” and a federal system might “dismember” the country by adding political segregation. (READ: LOOK BACK: When did the Philippines have a revolutionary government?)

“[W]e should focus our efforts in connecting our many islands with top technologies in ICT, aircrafts, seacrafts, roads, and bridges," the group said.

A revolutionary government is commonly associated with collapsing all branches of government and throwing out the Constitution to build a new a system as seen fit by the revolution’s leader.

The Philippines has had two revolutionary governments so far: one under Emilio Aguinaldo, and another under Corazon Aquino, following the ouster of dictator Ferdinand Marcos.

The idea of a “revolutionary government” is again being floated by supporters of President Rodrigo Duterte, even if it has yet to have a legal definition.

Meanwhile, Duterte's economic team had previously opposed proposals to shift to a federal form of government, with Finance Secretary Carlos Dominguez III stating that it might scare off investors. – Rappler.com

Ralf Rivas

A sociologist by heart, a journalist by profession. Ralf is Rappler's business reporter, covering macroeconomy, government finance, companies, and agriculture.

image