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Rappler Talk: What a board game can teach you about entrepreneurship

While people generally agree that the Philippines would benefit from having more entrepreneurs, most Filipinos disagree on how we should exactly achieve that goal. 

Some believe that formal education, such as what an undergraduate business degree or an MBA program would provide, are the way to go. Others believe that business events, such as conferences, seminars, and workshops, are the best way to promote entrepreneurship.

Filipino entrepreneur Richard Dacalos believes a far more unconventional route is the answer: board games. Dacalas conceptualized and developed the role-playing board game, UPSTART, which he bills as a way for players to experience the successes and failures of a startup without the risk.

UPSTART hails from a long line of board games that incorporate elements of business or entrepreneurship, and it seeks to revitalize the dormant genre. Upstart players have praised the game, and it may be distributed internationally pending its current round of crowdfunding, but the question remains: Can a board game really turn players into entrepreneurs? – Rappler.com