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Lea Salonga explains Facebook post: 'I never cursed the Philippines'

Lea Salonga took to Twitter on Monday, June 22 to explain a Facebook post which made her trend on social media last week.

In a June 15 Facebook post, the singer wrote: "Dear Pilipinas, p***** ina, ang hirap mong mahalin." (Dear Philippines, f**k, you're hard to love.) 

In a series of tweets, the Voice of the Philippines coach and international theater actress "clarified" what she meant by that post.

"Hi, gang. It seems a recent Facebook post of mine has gotten quite a bit of attention and launched all sorts of... I don’t even know what word to use, so I thought to use this platform and this space to offer some clarification in the hope that I’m more clearly understood."

"Regarding the post itself, yes I stand by every single word I wrote as an expression of my frustration with certain events currently taking place in our country. However, contrary to what some of you might believe, I never, NOT EVER, cursed the Philippines," she said.

"To serve her is one of my greatest honors. To be able to hold my head up high and say, 'Yes, I am Filipino' representing the hundreds of millions of brethren both here at home and all over the world is a source of pride and pleasure."

She apologized to those who were offended by the post and said she understands those who don't believe in her even if she said sorry.

"I totally understand and get that you’re doing it as one tasked to protect our country from anyone that dares to desecrate it. Know though that that was not my intent."

She also thanked her followers and fans who have been supporting her, saying that she's grateful for them.

Lea didn't say what she was reacting to in the original Facebook post. Responding to a commented who said the government had a "bulok (rotten) system," Lea replied: "I want to think fixing the system is possible still, albeit difficult. But we may now be beyond that point."

Lea also shared an article about about an exhibition that showed what women were wearing when they were raped — a reminder that rape and sexual assault doesn't happen because of what a person wears but because rapists and harassers exist.

"There is no dress code for rape. Stop blaming victims for crimes done against them. Sole responsibility should be on the rapist. Full stop," she said. – Rappler.com