Walking Rizal’s steps: Where to go in Dapitan, Zamboanga del Norte

"Beside a spacious beach of fine and delicate sand

and at the foot of a mountain greener than a leaf,

I planted my humble hut beneath a pleasant orchard,

seeking in the still serenity of the woods

repose to my intellect and silence to my grief."

So thus began “Mi Retiro” (My Retreat), one of the poems Jose Rizal wrote during his exile in Dapitan, Zamboanga del Norte.

The national hero’s 4 years in Dapitan may indeed be likened to a retreat, as he lived majority of them in his seaside property with nipa huts, fruit trees, a farm, and a rustling brook. From July 1892-1896 he had a quiet life farming, teaching students, treating patients, writing, making art, doing business, and designing engineering feats like a water system for the town, among others.

Even as Rizal left Dapitan, his presence and his contributions there remain palpable, and to explore the town today is not just about getting information on his life there, but also about experiencing it.

When you tour Dapitan, you can have your own retreat too, as you breathe in the sea breeze and relax at the hero’s home surrounded by greenery, among other places where his presence lingers.

Below are spots you can visit in Dapitan to get a feel of Rizal’s retreat: 

INTO THE SEA. From the waters running along his property Rizal would take a baroto (canoe) to town to treat more patients. From this bay Rizal also sailed to Manila at the end of his exile on July 31, 1896.

INTO THE SEA. From the waters running along his property Rizal would take a baroto (canoe) to town to treat more patients. From this bay Rizal also sailed to Manila at the end of his exile on July 31, 1896.

 

Rizal Park and Shrine is open daily, 8 am to 5 pm, while the museum is open Tuesday to Sunday, same time. Admission is free.

Rizal landing site

On the evening of July 17, 1892, Rizal first set foot on Dapitan, arriving at Sta. Cruz Beach. He rode on the steamer Cebu, along with military corps as well as prisoners, one due for execution.

From the steamer the ship captain and some artillery men accompanied Rizal to the small boat that would take him to the shore. The sea was rough, and in his account of his journey to Dapitan, Rizal described the beach as “very gloomy,” perhaps reflecting his mood about his exile.

The site at present, though, is far from gloomy as it shines with the golden monument of Rizal with the captain and the artillery men who brought him to the shore. Also, the road along the landing site is called Sunset Boulevard, as this is a good spot to watch the sunset.

ARRIVAL. The Rizal landing site commemorates the arrival of Rizal in Dapitan. Also in the monument are the captain of the steamer he rode to Dapitan and some artillery men who went with him to the shore.

ARRIVAL. The Rizal landing site commemorates the arrival of Rizal in Dapitan. Also in the monument are the captain of the steamer he rode to Dapitan and some artillery men who went with him to the shore.

 

STA. CRUZ BEACH. You can also go for a walk along the beach where Rizal first walked Dapitan.

STA. CRUZ BEACH. You can also go for a walk along the beach where Rizal first walked Dapitan.

Take in the shining sculptures and walk along the beach. Wait for the sunset, if you have time.  You can even stay until nightfall, the time of Rizal’s arrival.

St. James Church and Dapitan Plaza

“I am determined to do all I can on behalf of this town.” These are the words inscribed on Rizal’s immaculate white monument on the town plaza.

Indeed, Rizal did much for Dapitan, just among them remodeling the town plaza and designing a relief map of Mindanao, which also served as a teaching tool for the town’s students.

RIZAL'S DEDICATION. On Rizal's monument at the town plaza are his words of determination on doing all he can for Dapitan.

RIZAL'S DEDICATION. On Rizal's monument at the town plaza are his words of determination on doing all he can for Dapitan.

 

MINDANAO MAP. The map is made from soil, stones, and grass, made with the help of Rizal's teacher Father Francisco de Paula Sanchez. Photo by Potpot Pinili

MINDANAO MAP. The map is made from soil, stones, and grass, made with the help of Rizal's teacher Father Francisco de Paula Sanchez.

Photo by Potpot Pinili

For St. James Church, which was built in 1871, Rizal painted a backdrop for the church altar inspired by a church in Barcelona. The painting was destroyed later by fire, though.

Rizal went to Mass every Sunday at St. James Church. He stayed near the entrance, as he could not go near the altar during Mass because of his excommunication from the Catholic Church. There is a historical marker for Rizal’s usual spot inside the church.

DAPITAN CHURCH. St. James Church at the perimeter of the town plaza. Rizal went to Mass here regularly.

DAPITAN CHURCH. St. James Church at the perimeter of the town plaza. Rizal went to Mass here regularly.

INTERIORS. Rizal once painted the backdrop for the altar at St. James Church, but it was later destroyed by a fire.

INTERIORS. Rizal once painted the backdrop for the altar at St. James Church, but it was later destroyed by a fire.

RIZAL'S SUNDAY SPOT. On the left with a marker is where Rizal stayed during Sunday mass.

RIZAL'S SUNDAY SPOT. On the left with a marker is where Rizal stayed during Sunday mass.

Walk around the plaza, trace the map of Mindanao with your footsteps, and stand in Rizal’s place inside St. James Church and imagine how he was then, attending Sunday Mass.

There are more Rizal spots to explore in Dapitan, though some would have to be restored, like the town’s water system Rizal designed. The places above are already enough to help you step back in time and somehow see Dapitan through his eyes.

How to get to Dapitan: Take a flight to Dipolog. From the airport, ride a tricycle to Dipolog City terminal then ride a bus or van to Dapitan. The bus and van will pass by the town plaza and church. From there you can take a tricycle to Rizal Park and Shrine, as well as to the landing site. Travel time from Dipolog is around 30 minutes or more. – Rappler.com

 

 Claire Madarang is a writer, researcher, and documenter whose work and wanderlust takes her to adventures like backpacking for seven weeks and exploring remote islands and bustling cities alike. Follow her adventures, travel tips, and epiphanies on her blog Traveling Light and on her Instagram

 

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