Do you know how to apply for a driver’s license?

Aika Rey
Do you know how to apply for a driver’s license?
Here's how to properly apply for a driver's license in the Philippines and avoid 'fixers' that help breed corruption

MANILA, Philippines – If there are “fixers” offering faster transactions left and right, would you be tempted to give in?

“Fixers” are said to be common at the Land Transportation Office (LTO), which is often tagged as one of the most corrupt government agencies in the Philippines.

The applicant will be spared from long lines and hours of waiting for his or her driver’s license, but it won’t come cheap. (READ: The fixing business at LTO)

In the 2014/2015 survey conducted by the Social Weather Stations (SWS), the LTO was rated poor at -26 in its sincerity to fight corruption. It used to be “bad” in the previous year, rated 6 notches lower at -32.

 

President Rodrigo Duterte recently vowed to be harsher against corrupt government officials and employees, especially those at the LTO. He reiterated this on Sunday, August 21, and demanded that appointed officials leave their posts.

As a citizen, here’s how you can properly get a driver’s license – and avoid falling prey to “fixers” that help breed corruption.

Applying for a driver’s license

A driver’s license is an official government document authorizing an individual to drive a motor vehicle in the Philippines.

The LTO issues 3 types of driver’s licenses:

  1. Student permit
  2. Non-professional driver’s license
  3. Professional driver’s license

You can apply at any licensing center or district office that issues new driver’s licenses.

Student Permit

A student permit is a prerequisite document when applying for a driver’s license. Take note that this document authorizes the holder to drive only when accompanied by a licensed driver.

To apply for one, the applicant must be at least 17 years old as well as physically and mentally capable of driving a motor vehicle. The LTO also requires the applicant to know how to read and write in Filipino or English.

When applying for a student permit, here’s what you need to bring:

  1. Original copy and photocopy of birth certificate
  2. Accomplished application form for driver’s license – You can download the form here.
  3. If already employed: Tax Identification Number (TIN)

Once you have all of the requirements, you can now submit your documents to the LTO:

  1. Queue number. Go to the Customer Service Counter to get your checklist of requirements and your queue number. If you have not accomplished the Driver’s License application form, you can ask for a copy at the counter.
  2. Submit requirements. Once your number is called, go to the evaluator counter and submit all the required documents to have it checked for completeness and authenticity.
  3. Photo taking. When your name is called, follow where your photo and signature will be taken.
  4. Pay fees. Go to the cashier to pay the fees and make sure to get the official receipt.
  5. Claim permit. Proceed to the releasing counter with the OR and claim your permit.

Here’s how much you should be paying:

LTO Fees and Charges
Student Permit Fee P150.00
Application Fee P100.00
Computer Fee P67.63
Total P317.63

 

Non-professional and professional driver’s licenses

The applicant must be at least 18 years old, physically and mentally fit to operate a motor vehicle, and knows how to read and write in Filipino or English.

Bring the following documents when applying:

  1. Accomplished application form for driver’s license – You can download the form here.
  2. Valid student permit at least one month old
  3. Medical certificate – It must be with an official receipt from any duly licensed and practicing physician. Take note as well that the LTO does not accept medical certificates which are over 15 days old.
  4. Negative drug test result. It must be from a DOH-accredited drug testing center or a government hospital.
  5. Passing marks for the written and practical examinations
  6. If employed: Tax Identification Number (TIN)
  7. If applying for a professional driver’s license:
    1. NBI or police or court clearance
    2. In case of heavy vehicles: bring a valid non-professional driver’s license for at least one year prior to application or a valid professional driver’s license to operate light vehicles for at least 6 months.

Bring all the required documents to the LTO and follow the procedures:

  1. Queue number. Go to the Customer Service Counter to get your checklist of requirements and your queue number. If you have not accomplished the Driver’s License application form, you can ask for a copy at the counter.
  2. Submit requirements. Once your number is called, go to the evaluator counter and submit all the required documents to have it checked for completeness and authenticity.
  3. Photo taking. When your name is called, follow where your photo and signature will be taken.
  4. Pay for the application fee.
  5. Take the written test. Go to the examination room for the lecture and written exam.
  6. Take the practical driving test. After passing the written test, wait for your name to be called for the practical test.
  7. Pay for the rest of the fees. After passing the practical test, proceed to the cashier to pay for other necessary fees (license fee and computer fee). Make sure to get your official receipt.
  8. Claim permit. Proceed to the releasing counter with the OR and claim your permit.

Here’s how much you should expect to pay:

LTO Fees and Charges
First Cashier Payment (Step 4)
Application Fee P100.00
Computer Fee P67.63
Total P167.63
Second Cashier Payment (Step 7)
License Fee P350.00
Computer Fee P67.63
Total P417.63

 

Applicants who failed the Basic Driving Theory test and/or the practical driving test twice will not be allowed to apply within a period of one year.

If you took the test for the third time and failed, you have to wait another two years to be able to apply again. – Rappler.com

Source: Land Transportation Office

Do you think this is helpful? Let us know in the comments which other government processes you want to learn more about.

Have you ever been asked for a bribe? E-mail details to notonmywatch@rappler.com. It will help if you send supporting documents and contact information so we can reach you in case we need more details.

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Aika Rey

Aika Rey is a business reporter for Rappler. She covered the Senate of the Philippines before fully diving into numbers and companies. Got tips? Find her on Twitter at @reyaika or shoot her an email at aika.rey@rappler.com.