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WATCH: What Boracay looks like after it was closed down

Rappler.com
The shores of Boracay Island's White Sand Beach are almost empty on the day it is closed to the public

ALMOST EMPTY. The shores of Boracay Island's White Sand Beach are almost empty on the day it is closed to the public. Photo by Adrian Portugal/Rappler

AKLAN, Philippines – Just yesterday, the white shores of Boracay was full of tourists. Now that it is officially closed to the public, Boracay is almost empty.

While non-residents who are currently inside the island are not forced to leave, tourists are no longer allowed to visit Boracay while the 6-month rehabilitation works are ongoing.

This led to some businesses closing down during the period as well. (READ: Businesses brace for Boracay closure)

The once pristine destination hailed for its white sand beach has become a “cesspool”, President Rodrigo Duterte said earlier, because of environmental problems. (WATCH: The last few minutes before Boracay is closed)

This led to the President’s order to close down the top tourist destination for at least 6 months.

Despite the increasing levels of water pollution, about two million tourists travelled to Western Visayas in 2017 to enjoy the famous white sand beach. (READ: Boracay: From pristine island to fragile paradise)– Rappler.com