Provide your email for confirmation

Tell us a bit about yourself

country *

Please provide your email address

welcome to Rappler

Login

To share your thoughts

Don't have an account?

Login with email

Check your inbox

We just sent a link to your inbox. Click the link to continue signing in. Can’t find it? Check your spam & junk mail.

Didn't get a link?

Use password?

Login with email

Reset password?

Please use the email you used to register and we will send you a link to reset your password

Check your inbox

We just sent a link to your inbox. Click the link to continue resetting your password. Can’t find it? Check your spam & junk mail.

Didn't get a link?

Sign up

Ready to get started

Already have an account?

Sign up with email

By signing up you agree to Rappler’s Terms and Conditions and Privacy

Check your inbox

We just sent a link to your inbox. Click the link to continue registering. Can’t find it? Check your spam & junk mail.

Didn't get a link?

Join Rappler+

Join Move

How often would you like to pay?

Annual Subscription

Monthly Subscription

Your payment was interrupted

Exiting the registration flow at this point will mean you will loose your progress

Your payment didn’t go through

Exiting the registration flow at this point will mean you will loose your progress

welcome to Rappler+

welcome to Move

welcome to Move & Rappler+

Batas Kasambahay: A law exploited

Implementation of Batas Kasambahay 

Despite this existing culture of exploitation, Charisma Satumba, director of the Bureau of Workers with Special Concerns of the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE), claims that since the implementation of Batas Kasambahay, a lot of domestic workers have benefitted from the law. There are kasambahay desk officers in every DOLE regional office where employees can voice their concerns. 

According to Satumba, the reports on abuse and unjust working conditions of domestic works have increased since the law was passed. She cited two disputes settled by DOLE: Archie Mendoza, who was illegally dismissed, was paid P40,000 ($875), while another domestic worker, who hasn’t been paid in 4 years, got P324,000 ($7,000).

But there are still those who remain in the dark. Satumba said it is difficult to monitor the working conditions of every domestic helper, especially since they are usually stuck at home and have no other avenues to voice their concerns unless they approach DOLE. 

Malou Monge, who was a domestic worker for 7 years, adds that a lot of cases remain unreported also because domestic workers are not aware of what they are entitled to.

DOWNTIME. Buboy, whose mother has been working for he same family for over 20 years, watches television during his downtime while his employer is away. He is in charge of household chores, cleaning, and bathing the dog.

#OurHands Campaign

To increase awareness about domestic workers’ rights and to improve the implementation of Batas Kasambahay, Migrant Forum in Asia (MFA), together with the Philippine Decent Work for Domestic Workers Technical Working Group (DomWork TWG), launched the #OurHands Campaign on World Day for Decent Work. 

#OurHands Campaign uses Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram to form a community of domestic workers both in the Philippines and abroad. 

It aims to form a support group of domestic helpers where information about their rights and benefits can be disseminated, and their concerns can be heard by different organizations, government agencies, and fellow domestic helpers as well.

Julius Cainglet, assistant vice president of the Federation of Free Workers (FFW), a member of the DomWork TWG, said, “As the prime user of social media, especially of Facebook across the globe, a campaign like #OurHands will surely create greater solidarity among Filipino domestic workers both here and abroad."

However, even though they are vocal about their rights, some employers still do not fully comply with the Batas Kasambahay. Tired of reminding their employers of their rights and benefits, some resorted to wearing statement shirts bearing their rights, hoping that the constant reminder will compel their employers to treat them justly. 

ORGANIZED. Kasambahays' personal belongings are placed in the dirty kichen together with their employers' things.

Even though some employers remain abusive despite knowledge of the law, Monge believes that being vocal about one’s rights is still better than staying silent.

Pag alam ng employers mo na marunong ka magsalita at alam mo ang karapatan mo, mas protektado ka (If your employers know that you are willing to speak up about your rights, you have more protection)," said Monge. Rappler.com

$1 = P45.68