Cebu City taking down illegal 'Run Sara Run' streamers

The Cebu City government announced on Tuesday, February 23, that it would remove illegal pre-election campaign streamers that have been posted over the city’s skywalks.

This developed after Cebu City Mayor Edgar Labella was asked during a live press conference about the proliferation of "Run Sara Run" posters in different parts of the city.

Labella replied during the virtual media briefing that he would order these streamers be taken down if these do not have the required permits.

Similar posters have been seen all over the country, even as far north as Benguet province, claiming to urge President Rodrigo Duterte's daughter Sara to run for higher public office. Sara Duterte is the incumbent mayor of Davao City.

National elections are set in May 2022.

After the online briefing, the chief of city's Office of the Building Official (OBO), the agency which issues permits for posting in public, told Rappler that it has not approved the "Run Sara Run" posters.

Florante Catalan, the OBO head, told Rappler in a phone conversation that because the "Run Sara Run" streamers which have sprouted in the city have no permits, the city would remove them.

“Of course, di gyud ta kapugong usahay sa mga tawo sa ilang gibati pero tungod kay naa may regulation, I will have it checked by OBO kung naa ba nay permit,” Labella said.

(Of course, we can’t control sometimes the feelings of the people but because there are regulations, I will have it checked by OBO to see if there was a permit.)

Patang-tangon na basta way permit,” he added.

(We will have it removed if these do not have permits.)

Some netizens have called out these posters, saying this pre-campaigning is illegal.

The president said in January that his daughter Sara would not run for president in 2022, adding that Philippine presidency was not a job for women

However, the "not running" pronouncements are reminiscent of Duterte's own ambivalent statements before plunging into and winning the presidential race in 2016. — Rappler.com