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College of the Holy Spirit Manila to close down in 2022

The College of the Holy Spirit Manila (CHSM), founded more than a century ago, is closing down in 2022.

"Be it known that the College of the Holy Spirit Manila will voluntarily cease operations at the end of [academic year] 2021-2022," CHSM said in a statement on Sunday, November 22.

The school said current Grade 11 and 3rd year college students will still be able to graduate, but levels K to Grade 11 and 1st to 3rd year college will not be opened for academic year 2021-2022.

CHSM did not cite the reasons for its closure in the statement. But the education sector is one of the casualties of the coronavirus pandemic, with a number of private schools forced to halt operations.

In September, the Department of Education (DepEd) said a total of 865 private schools suspended their operations this year due to low enrollment turnout and inability to meet the requirements for the conduct of distance learning.

In July, the DepEd also said over 200,000 students transferred from private to public schools. Education Secretary Leonor Briones attributed the transfer of students to the economic downturn brought by the pandemic.

CHSM was founded in 1913 by the Missionary Sisters Servants of the Holy Spirit, initially as an exclusive school for girls. It started accepting male students in 2005, according to its Facebook page.

CHSM is part of the Mendiola Consortium, an organization of educational institutions located along the street of Mendiola in Manila. Other schools in the consortium include Centro Escolar University, La Consolacion College Manila, San Beda University, and Saint Jude Catholic School. – Rappler.com