Barangay, SK polls 2018: How much will electoral board members get paid?

MANILA, Philippines – The barangay and Sangguniang Kabataan (SK) elections of 2018 will be the first time Republic Act 10756, which was enacted in 2015, will be implemented at the village level. The law allows the appointment of volunteers should public school teachers refuse to do election duties

The volunteers will be named by the Commission on Elections (Comelec), through local election officers, and will be paid honoraria and covered by some benefits. They will watch over voting, manually count the ballots, and keep their precincts peaceful from 6 am on election day, May 14, up to when they deliver vote counts to the barangay board of canvassers in the evening. 

Each electoral board has a chairperson, a poll clerk, and a member, further assisted by Department of Education Supervisor Officials (DESOs) and support staff. 

RA 10756 sets the following honoraria:

Volunteers are also entitled to receive additional allowances and insurance, broken down by Comelec's Resolution Number 10211 as:

The allowances need to be distributed within 15 days from election day.

According to Comelec spokesperson James Jimenez on Monday, May 7, the government will pay the workers through cash cards or hard cash.

What does it take to be an electoral board member? The Comelec resolution does not name what kind of professionals can be appointed to the board in the absence of teachers.

It only says possible appointees must be registered voters "of good moral character and irreproachable reputation," who are "of known integrity and competence," and can speak and write Filipino, English, or the local dialect.

They should never have been convicted of any election offense or of any crime punishable by more than 6 months in jail, and has no election offense being investigated.

A Comelec officer cannot appoint to the board any relative up to the 4th degree of consanguinity or affinity.

The poll body is also prohibited from designating any electoral board member to a precinct where residents can vote his or her spouse. – Rappler.com

Graphic by Ken Bautista; photos by Alecs Ongcal, Martin San Diego, Mau Victa/Rappler 

Rambo Talabong

Rambo Talabong covers the House of Representatives and local governments for Rappler. Prior to this, he covered security and crime. He was named Jaime V. Ongpin Fellow in 2019 for his reporting on President Rodrigo Duterte’s war on drugs. In 2021, he was selected as a journalism fellow by the Fellowships at Auschwitz for the Study of Professional Ethics.

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