MMDA to ask Duterte hazard pay for traffic enforcers

MANILA, Philippines – The Metropolitan Manila Development Authority said they will be asking the government for hazard pay for its traffic enforcers.

In a statement sent to the media on Saturday, June 15, the MMDA said that Chairman Danilo Lim addressed about 300 traffic enforcers on Friday, June 14, about the additional employment benefit.

"I understand your plight in manning your posts and we have been pushing for the granting of your hazard pay considering the risks you encounter daily," Lim said.

He said that the MMDA will write a letter to the Office of the President to "revive the granting of hazard pay."

"Let's hope we be given the chance," he told the enforcers.

A study conducted by the National Institute for Health at the University of the Philippines Manila showed that being exposed to black carbon and heavy metals affects MDMA traffic enforcers' blood pressure and lung function.

According to the study, lead was found in enforcers' blood which could imply systemic inflammation. Female enforcers, as well as those who never smoked a single cigarette in their lives, were found susceptible to this.

The study was conducted among 158 traffic enforcers.

Lim on Friday gave assurances that the traffic agency listens to the needs of their enforcers.

"Do not lose hope. We have so many plans. Expect more good things to come our way and as front-liners, you are the first who would benefit. Just render excellent public service in the performance of your duties," he said.

MMDA traffic enforcers earn a minimum wage of P537 daily or about P11,800 monthly.

The MMDA has asked the 17th Congress to pass a law providing for a P6,000-monthly hazard pay to traffic enforcers. But this proposal was initially meant to address the extortion problem among some enforcers.

Under the 2019 budget, the MMDA has a P3.36-billion allocation, of which P53.11 million is for the operation and maintenace of its Traffic Discipline Office. – Rappler.com

Aika Rey

Aika Rey covers the Philippine Senate for Rappler. Before writing about politicians, she covered budget, labor, and transportation issues.

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