Provide your email for confirmation

Tell us a bit about yourself

country *

Please provide your email address

welcome to Rappler

Login

To share your thoughts

Don't have an account?

Login with email

Check your inbox

We just sent a link to your inbox. Click the link to continue signing in. Can’t find it? Check your spam & junk mail.

Didn't get a link?

Use password?

Login with email

Reset password?

Please use the email you used to register and we will send you a link to reset your password

Check your inbox

We just sent a link to your inbox. Click the link to continue resetting your password. Can’t find it? Check your spam & junk mail.

Didn't get a link?

Sign up

Ready to get started

Already have an account?

Sign up with email

By signing up you agree to Rappler’s Terms and Conditions and Privacy

Check your inbox

We just sent a link to your inbox. Click the link to continue registering. Can’t find it? Check your spam & junk mail.

Didn't get a link?

Join Rappler+

Join Move

How often would you like to pay?

Annual Subscription

Monthly Subscription

Your payment was interrupted

Exiting the registration flow at this point will mean you will loose your progress

Your payment didn’t go through

Exiting the registration flow at this point will mean you will loose your progress

welcome to Rappler+

welcome to Move

welcome to Move & Rappler+

UN rights chief: Continued killings by police in PH still ‘a serious concern’

United Nations (UN) High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet on Friday, February 26, expressed concern over still rising number of deaths in the hands of the Philippine National Police (PNP).

"The continued high number of killings by police remain a serious concern," she said in a speech during the 46th session of the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC).

Bachelet's update comes days after Philippine Justice Secretary Menardo Guevarra announced that an inter-agency panel found that police did not follow protocols in more than half of the anti-drug operations it reviewed.

The review panel was launched in June 2020, following a scathing report by Bachelet's office on Duterte's war on drugs. It found that the flagship campaign of the administration was being carried out without due process and that the local system wasn’t enough to exact accountability over the killings.

Police data showed that, as of January 31, at least 6,039 suspected drug personalities had been killed during police operations. Human rights groups, meanwhile, estimate a higher 27,000 to 30,000 victims, including those killed by alleged vigilantes.

'Effective results' sought

Bachelet on Friday said that her office was "working with a range of partners" to implement an October 2020 resolution by the UNHRC, which offered "technical assistance" to the Duterte government to address the widespread killings in the country.

"A UN joint program on human rights is being finalized, and I will continue to urge the genuine and meaningful participation of all possible constituencies so that it can deliver effective results," she said.

Human rights groups, meanwhile, argued that the findings of the government's panel is enough reason to end the violent drug war.

Duterte's anti-illegal drugs campaign is the subject of a case before the Supreme Court. A Rappler investigation showed that the Duterte government was able to stall the case by submitting "rubbish" files on police anti-drug operations. It has been pending since 2018.

The International Criminal Court is expected to decide by the first half of 2021 whether or not to open a formal investigation into the Philippine killings. – Rappler.com

Jodesz Gavilan

Jodesz Gavilan is a writer and researcher for Rappler and its investigative arm, Newsbreak. She covers human rights and also hosts the weekly podcast Newsbreak: Beyond the Stories. She joined Rappler in 2014 after obtaining her journalism degree from the University of the Philippines.

image