PAGASA forecasts

‘Summer’ is here: Philippines’ hot dry season begins

Acor Arceo
‘Summer’ is here: Philippines’ hot dry season begins

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'Day-to-day weather across the country will gradually become warmer, though isolated thunderstorms are also likely to occur,' says PAGASA

The state weather bureau announced the end of the northeast monsoon or amihan season and the start of the Philippines’ hot dry season – often called “summer” – on Friday, March 26.

The amihan season refers to the country’s cool dry season, usually from December to February, while the hot dry season is typically from March to May.

The Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical, and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) said in a statement on Friday that the “gradual shift of wind direction from northeasterly to easterly over most parts of the country” signified the end of the northeast monsoon.

“Day-to-day weather across the country will gradually become warmer, though isolated thunderstorms are also likely to occur,” PAGASA also said.

“The public is advised to take precautionary measures to minimize heat stress and optimize the daily use of water for personal and domestic consumption.”

The Philippines technically does not have “summer” as it only has two seasons – rainy and dry – but Filipinos commonly use the term to refer to the hot dry season.

PAGASA earlier said La Niña, which began in October 2020, is weakening. This weather phenomenon causes above normal rainfall.

So far, the country has had only one tropical cyclone in 2021. Auring (Dujuan), which struck in February, reached severe tropical storm status but eventually hit land as a tropical depression.

Tropical cyclones are rare but not impossible during the hot dry season. PAGASA expects zero or one tropical cyclone inside the Philippine Area of Responsibility in April, and also zero or one in May. – Rappler.com

Acor Arceo

Acor Arceo is the head of copy and editorial standards at Rappler. Trained in both online and TV newsrooms, Acor supervises Rappler’s coverage of disasters, handles the business desk, and ensures consistency in editorial standards across all sections.