Provide your email for confirmation

Tell us a bit about yourself

country *
province *

why we ask about location

Please provide your email address

Login

To share your thoughts

Don't have an account?

Login with email

Check your inbox

We just sent a link to your inbox. Click the link to continue signing in. Can’t find it? Check your spam & junk mail.

Didn't get a link?

Sign up

Ready to get started

Already have an account?

Sign up with email

By signing up you agree to Rappler’s Terms and Conditions and Privacy

Check your inbox

We just sent a link to your inbox. Click the link to continue registering. Can’t find it? Check your spam & junk mail.

Didn't get a link?

Join Rappler+

How often would you like to pay?

Monthly Subscription

Your payment was interrupted

Exiting the registration flow at this point will mean you will loose your progress

Your payment didn’t go through

Exiting the registration flow at this point will mean you will loose your progress

Tropical Storm Onyok continues to strengthen

What's the weather like in your area? Tweet us at @rapplerdotcom.

MANILA, Philippines – Tropical Storm Onyok (Mitag) slightly intensified again and slowed down over the Philippine Sea on Saturday evening, September 28.

In a bulletin issued 11 pm on Saturday, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical, and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) said Onyok now has maximum winds of 85 kilometers per hour (km/h) from the previous 75 km/h and gustiness of up to 105 km/h from the previous 90 km/h.

Onyok might intensify further into a severe tropical storm, and then possibly into a typhoon after that. (READ: FAST FACTS: Tropical cyclones, rainfall advisories)

It is already 760 kilometers east of Tuguegarao City, Cagayan, moving west northwest at a slower 25 km/h from the previous 35 km/h.

Onyok is not expected to make landfall in the Philippines. But Signal No. 1 remains raised in:

Signal No. 1 means winds of 30 km/h to 60 km/h are expected.

Travel is also risky, especially for small vessels, in seaboards of areas under Signal No. 1.

PAGASA added that Onyok's trough or extension is bringing scattered rainshowers and thunderstorms, ranging from light to moderate. Two regions are affected until Sunday evening, September 29:

The rest of the country will only have isolated rainshowers or localized thunderstorms on Sunday.

Based on Onyok's latest forecast track, it could leave the Philippine Area of Responsibility on Monday, September 30.

Forecast track of Tropical Storm Onyok (Mitag) as of September 28, 2019, 11 pm. Image from PAGASA

Forecast track of Tropical Storm Onyok (Mitag) as of September 28, 2019, 11 pm.

Image from PAGASA

Onyok is the Philippines' 15th tropical cyclone for 2019, and the 5th in September. (READ: LIST: PAGASA's names for tropical cyclones in 2019)

The country gets an average of 20 tropical cyclones annually, but since 2019 is an El Niño year, only 14 to 18 tropical cyclones are expected.

At most 4 tropical cyclones had been previously forecast for September. Below is the estimated number of tropical cyclones from September to December:

PAGASA declared the start of the rainy season last June 14. – Rappler.com

Acor Arceo

Acor Arceo is a Central Desk editor for Rappler. Trained in both online and TV newsrooms, Acor supervises Rappler’s coverage of disasters, handles the business desk, and ensures consistency in editorial standards across all sections.

image