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Typhoon Paeng strengthens, but landfall more unlikely

What's the weather like in your area? Report the situation through Rappler's Agos or tweet us at @rapplerdotcom.

MANILA, Philippines – Typhoon Paeng (Trami) strengthened again before dawn on Monday, September 24, but its track has slightly moved up, which means its landfall in the Philippines is even more unlikely.

In a Facebook Live video past 5 am on Monday, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical, and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) said Paeng now has maximum winds of 170 kilometers per hour (km/h) from the previous 150 km/h and gustiness of 210 km/h from the previous 185 km/h.

The typhoon is located 1,100 kilometers east of Tuguegarao City, Cagayan, still moving west northwest at 20 km/h.

Paeng does not have a direct effect on any part of the Philippines at the moment, due to its distance from land. There are no areas under tropical cyclone warning signals yet.

The typhoon is also not expected to significantly enhance the southwest monsoon or hanging habagat.

But PAGASA warned that the outer rainbands of the typhoon might affect extreme Northern Luzon, or Batanes and the Babuyan Group of Islands, on Friday, September 28.

Tropical cyclone warning signals could be raised in extreme Northern Luzon as early as Thursday, September 27.

A gale warning could also be issued for the seaboards of Northern Luzon as Paeng approaches. This means fishermen and others with small sea vessels may be warned about rough to very rough seas.

Based on its latest forecast track, Paeng could leave the Philippine Area of Responsibility on Saturday, September 29.

Forecast track of Typhoon Paeng (Trami) as of September 25, 2018, 5 am. Image from PAGASA

Forecast track of Typhoon Paeng (Trami) as of September 25, 2018, 5 am.

Image from PAGASA

But PAGASA emphasized that since the typhoon is still too far away from land, the forecast could still change. The public should continue monitoring updates. (READ: FAST FACTS: Tropical cyclones, rainfall advisories)

After Paeng, around 4 more tropical cyclones are expected in 2018. The Philippines usually gets an average of 20 tropical cyclones per year. (READ: LIST: PAGASA's names for tropical cyclones in 2018)

Parts of Luzon are still reeling from the impact of Typhoon Ompong (Mangkhut), which left nearly a hundred people dead and caused destruction in provinces up north. Dozens of people remain missing. (READ: Areas under state of calamity due to Typhoon Ompong)

On Monday, the whole country will only have localized thunderstorms, mostly in the afternoon or evening. But flash floods and landslides are also possible if the thunderstorms bring heavy rain.

PAGASA declared the start of the rainy season last June 8. – Rappler.com