Marcos Fact Checks

FALSE: AP YouTube video shows Marcos ordering banks to release his gold wealth

FALSE: AP YouTube video shows Marcos ordering banks to release his gold wealth
No such video can be found in the verified Associated Press YouTube channel or in the verified AP Archive YouTube channel. AP also says it cannot find such a video in its catalogue.
At a glance
  • Claim: Associated Press (AP) posted a video on YouTube about former president Ferdinand Marcos in 1984 (or 1985) ordering the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to release funds from his alleged gold deposits. 
  • Rating: FALSE
  • The facts: No such video can be found in the verified Associated Press YouTube channel or in the verified AP Archive YouTube channel, which shows historical footage. AP also says they cannot find such a video in their catalogue.
  • Why we fact-checked this: The claim was made in a post by the Facebook page “Maharlikan atin toh” on April 17. As of writing, the post has about 24,000 views, 1,900 comments, and 10,000 shares, and the video has been viewed about 524,000 times.
Complete details:

On Thursday, April 22, the Facebook page “Maharlikan atin toh” claimed in a video that Associated Press (AP) posted a YouTube video about former President Ferdinand Marcos ordering the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to release funds from his alleged gold deposits in 1984 (or 1985).

The video said: “Pero noong year 1984 (1985), mapapanuod ang isang video na inilabas ng Associated Press sa YouTube. Ito ay video kung saan nagbigay si Marcos ng public address sa television, at sinabi niya na huwag mawalan ng pagasa dahil inutusan niya ang World Bank, IMF, at iba pang hundred of banks sa buong mundo na maglabas ng fund mula sa kanyang mga ginto na naka collateral at naka deposito sa mga bangkong ito.”

(But in the year 1984 [1985], a video produced by the Associated Press was made available on YouTube. It is a video wherein Marcos gave a public address on television, and he told us to not lose hope because he ordered the World Bank, IMF, and hundreds of other banks around the world to release funds from his gold, which had been used as collateral and deposited in those banks.)

As of writing, the post by “Maharlikan atin toh” has about 24,000 views, 1,900 comments, and 10,000 shares, and the video has about 524,000 views. The video can also be found in the Facebook page “Filipino Future” and the YouTube channel with the same name. Both of these Facebook pages have been fact-checked in the past.

The claim is false. 

AP told Rappler in an email that it couldn’t find any video that matched the one claimed by “Maharlikan atin toh” and “Filipino Future” on their entire video catalogue, which includes videos on their YouTube channels and outside of it.

Rappler’s own search for the video on AP’s verified YouTube channel and the verified AP Archive YouTube channel didn’t yield any such video.

On the AP YouTube channel, searches using various keywords – like “ferdinand marcos,” “marcos philippines,” “marcos gold,” “marcos wealth,” or even just “marcos” – showed no videos about any order by Marcos to the World Bank and IMF to release wealth from his gold deposits. Similar keyword searches, including “marcos 1984” and “marcos 1985,” on the AP Archive channel showed no such videos either.

A further keyword search of the term “marcos” and covering the years 1984 and 1985 in the website of AP Archive showed no videos about any order by Marcos to the World Bank and IMF.

The video by “Maharlikan atin toh” and “Filipino Future” contained no information on how to access the alleged AP YouTube video. 

The video by “Maharlikan atin toh” and “Filipino Future” also contained a false claim that Rappler has previously fact-checked: the mention of a certain Father Jose Antonio Diaz, who was said to be Jose Rizal and who had alleged custody of Marcos’ wealth. 

Rappler has fact-checked claims related to “Marcos gold” before. – Percival Bueser/Rappler.com

This article was written by a volunteer of Rappler’s fact-checking mentorship program, a 5-week exclusive and hands-on training on detecting, investigating, and verifying online misinformation and disinformation.

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