health-related fact checks

FALSE: Chrysocolla bracelets can detoxify and regulate insulin, glucose levels

FALSE: Chrysocolla bracelets can detoxify and regulate insulin, glucose levels
Wearing Chrysocolla cannot detoxify your body and has no effect on insulin or glucose levels
At a glance
  • Claim: Chrysocolla bracelets can detoxify, and regulate insulin and glucose levels.
  • Rating: FALSE
  • The facts: Wearing Chrysocolla cannot detoxify your body and has no effect on insulin or glucose levels.
  • Why we fact-checked this: The video with this claim has over 13,000 views and over 500 shares.
Complete details

A Facebook post promoting the sale of Chrysocolla bracelets has claims that these can detoxify the body, as well as, manage the levels of insulin and sugar in the bloodstream.

This claim is false. 

There is no evidence that supports that Chrysocolla, a blue-green mineral containing copper, has any proven detoxification effects on the human body. 

Detoxification is a natural process mostly carried out by the liver as blood, which transports nutrients and other substances in our body pass through it. As bracelets, or any wearable accessory, do not directly come into contact with our internal organs, there is no plausible way in which they can detoxify or cleanse our bodies of toxic and harmful substances. 

The level of sugar or glucose in our bloodstream is mostly controlled by insulin, a protein that allows glucose to enter cells to be consumed for energy. Insulin is only produced by cells in the pancreas or may be taken as medication for conditions such as diabetes. 

Given the scientific understanding of the relationship between insulin and glucose levels, there is no scientific reason as to why Chrysocolla bracelets could help relieve the symptoms of diabetes, nor is copper used in the treatment of diabetes.  

The effective control of blood sugar levels through medication and lifestyle changes is key in preventing further damage to the organs and nerves of the body.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that there are 415 million people in the world suffering from diabetes. If you have diabetes or suspect yourself to be diabetic, it is best to consult with your physician to be given proper care and medications to control the levels of sugar in your blood. – Renzo Arceta/Rappler.com

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