health-related fact checks

Ener-Chi anti-radiation stickers don’t eradicate radiation from mobile phones

Rappler.com
Ener-Chi anti-radiation stickers don’t eradicate radiation from mobile phones
No scientific study or evidence proves that stickers claiming to protect users against radiation from mobile phones, tablets, laptops, computers, and TVs are effective or possible at all

Claim: Ener-Chi anti-radiation stickers completely eradicate radiation emitted by mobile phones and similar gadgets.

Rating: FALSE

Why we fact-checked this: Multiple posts containing this claim and other similar claims have been circulating on Facebook, garnering thousands of reactions and shares. 

The bottom line: There is no scientific study or evidence to prove that stickers claiming to protect users against radiofrequency (RF) radiation from mobile phones, tablets, laptops, computers, and televisions are effective or possible at all.

Not FDA approved: Ener-Chi anti-radiation stickers are not listed in the Philippine Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) verified catalog of medical devices. The product and manufacturer were also not included in the list of approved medical devices and manufacturers curated by the FDA’s Center for Device Regulation, Radiation Health, and Research. 

  • Rappler searched the FDA’s list for other variations of the product name Ener-Chi anti-radiation stickers like “anti-radiation” and “radiation sticker” but these names were also not registered.

What the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) says: There is no established health benefit from reducing an individual’s RF exposure to mobile phones. 

  • The US FDA also states that claims of accessories shielding users from radiation emissions or preventing health problems caused by them are “bogus” due to the “weight of scientific evidence” proving otherwise. 

Rappler has previously fact-checked similar health-related claims:

Sofia Guanzon/Rappler.com

Keep us aware of suspicious Facebook pages, groups, accounts, websites, articles, or photos in your network by contacting us at factcheck@rappler.com. You may also report dubious claims to #FactsFirstPH tipline by messaging Rappler on Facebook or Newsbreak via Twitter direct message. You may also report through our Viber fact check chatbot. Let us battle disinformation one Fact Check at a time.

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