Fact checks about countries

FALSE: Kuwait records 73ºC temperature

FALSE: Kuwait records 73ºC temperature
The hottest temperature recorded in Kuwait in 2021 was in Nuwaiseeb City at 53.2ºC on June 22

At a glance

  • Claim: 73 degrees Celsius (ºC) temperatures were recorded in Kuwait.
  • Rating: FALSE
  • The facts: On the day the post was published, July 4, the temperature in Kuwait City was 48ºC. The hottest temperature recorded in Kuwait in 2021 was in Nuwaiseeb City at 53.2ºC on June 22.
  • Why we fact-checked this: A post claiming this has, at the time of writing, garnered over 18,000 reactions and 163,000 shares.

Complete details:

A post by “میهنم,” an Afghanistan-based Facebook page, claimed on July 4 that Kuwait had recorded its highest temperature ever at 73ºC. At the time of writing, the post has garnered over 18,000 reactions and 163,000 shares.

This claim is false.

On July 4, the day the post was published, the temperature in Kuwait City was recorded at 48ºC. The hottest temperature recorded in Kuwait in 2021 was in Nuwaiseeb City at 53.2ºC on June 22.

The hottest temperature in the world ever recorded in history was 56.7ºC in July 1913 at the aptly named Furnace Creek, Death Valley, USA, according to the World Meteorological Organization.

A National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) study concluded that most humans will die of hyperthermia after only 10 minutes of exposure to a 60ºC heat. 

Because of human-induced climate change, June 2021 was the hottest June in history in the US. Further, 2016 and 2020 were the hottest years on record, with average temperatures roughly 1°C warmer than pre-industrial averages.

According to the Global Annual to Decadal Climate Update, produced by the United Kingdom’s Meteorological Office, there is a 90% likelihood of at least one year between 2021 to 2025 becoming the warmest on record, dislodging 2016 and 2020.

As a consequence of increasing temperatures, scientists predict that the Arctic will have its first ice-free summer by 2035

Further, global mean sea level is projected to rise by up to two meters by 2100. This would displace roughly 98% of Manileños from their homes and fully or partially sink major world cities such as Mumbai, New York, Miami, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Tokyo, and Amsterdam. – Jose Atienza/Rappler.com

Jose Atienza is a Rappler intern. This fact check was reviewed by a member of Rappler’s research team and a senior editor. Learn more about Rappler’s internship program here.

Keep us aware of suspicious Facebook pages, groups, accounts, websites, articles, or photos in your network by contacting us at factcheck@rappler.com. Let us battle disinformation one fact check at a time.

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