Grace Poe reporter-son goes on leave to help mom

POES. Senator Grace Poe poses with her family, including her son Brian (left-most), during the State of the Nation Address on July 27, 2015. File photo from Office of Senator Grace Poe

POES. Senator Grace Poe poses with her family, including her son Brian (left-most), during the State of the Nation Address on July 27, 2015.

File photo from Office of Senator Grace Poe

MANILA, Philippines – Amid talks of a possible candidacy in 2016, Senator Grace Poe’s son Brian took a leave from his reportorial job, starting Wednesday, August 5, “to help out” in his mother’s “exploratory team.” 

Brian, a reporter of CNN Philippines, confirmed to Rappler he is now on indefinite leave of absence from the company.

“It's final, I'm on leave immediately. As I'm sure you already know my mom is still deciding and is really studying her options. I'm taking a leave to help her in her decision-making,” Brian told Rappler in a text message.

He served as campaign manager when Senator Poe topped the 2013 senatorial elections. He also subbed for his mother in debates, proclamation rallies, and provincial sorties. 

President Benigno Aquino III and Senator Poe, the frontrunner in presidential preference surveys, met several times but failed to reach an agreement.

While Aquino did not directly say it, Senator Poe earlier admitted she felt the President wants her to be the running mate of administration standard-bearer Manuel “Mar” Roxas II.

The neophyte senator maintained she has yet to decide on her political plans – whether to run for president, for vice president, or not to run at all. 

Asked if her son's leave from work is a sure sign of her candidacy, the senator told Rappler: "He [Brian] is helping me with many things whether or not I decide to run. Also some are saying that it is better for him to take a leave because the assignments they can give him are limited."

‘Awkward’

Brian admitted his mother’s political affairs have affected his work.

Although the senator has yet to decide on her candidacy, Brian said it is “becoming increasingly awkward to cover certain stories” now that majority of the news is on the 2016 presidential elections.

“As a reporter, part of it also has to do with delicadeza (propriety). Though my mom hasn't made a decision yet, it's still hard for me as a reporter," he said in a text message.

The senator's son said people might see him as politically biased in his reports. – Rappler.com

Camille Elemia

Camille Elemia is Rappler's lead reporter for media, disinformation, and democracy. She won an ILO award in 2017. She received the prestigious Fulbright-Hubert Humphrey fellowship in 2019, allowing her to further study media and politics in the US. Email camille.elemia@rappler.com

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