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Paolo Roxas swings it, dad Mar shows battle scars

CAMPAIGN STORIES. Mar Roxas during a rally in Dagupan City. Photo by Alecs Ongcal/Rappler

CAMPAIGN STORIES. Mar Roxas during a rally in Dagupan City.

Photo by Alecs Ongcal/Rappler

CEBU, Philippines – Campaigning for a national post isn’t easy and most candidates – and their surrogates – will have the scars and the occasional video online to prove it. 

During a Wednesday, April 27 press conference in Talisay City, reporters couldn’t help but notice several wounds and scars on Liberal Party (LP) standard-bearer Manuel Roxas III’s hands. 

“I had to put antibiotics on them because a wound once got infected,” Roxas explained to media during a chat after the presser. 

It’s not very surprising because Roxas likes immersing himself during LP rallies. He goes around the hall, the gymnasium, or even the occasional open field, making sure supporters get a chance to shake his hand, exchange a few words with locals, or take the standard selfie. 

He jokes about this once he’s on stage to deliver his speech. He’d say he felt like a statue because people kept touching him, pulling his shirt, rubbing or pinching his belly.

Another standard joke is how he’d explain the traces of lipstick on his face and shirt to his wife, broadcaster Korina Sanchez. 

But some supporters can be overly enthusiastic, causing the scars on his hands – and sometimes, on his face. Roxas doesn’t really seem to mind. 

It’s the crowd's energy, he once told reporters, where he draws his own strength from. And energy is just what candidates need with less than two weeks left in the campaign period. 

Roxas and running mate Leni Robredo’s voices have been rather hoarse the past few weeks. No doubt, the result of the gruelling hours of an average campaign day. 

Wednesday’s solution to sore throat? Chewing on boiled ginger.

Paolo dances in Pasay

Roxas’ only son, Paolo Roxas, is also sure to have interesting stories to tell from the campaign trail. 

During a rally in Pasay City, the 23-year-old busted out his dancing (in particular, ballroom-dancing) moves, swinging to the tune of his father’s campaign jingle. 

He also led cheering efforts for his dad during the last presidential debate in Dagupan City last Sunday, April 24. Taking the stage in front of supporters immediately after the debate, Paolo apologized because he lost his voice “cheering for dad.” 

The younger Roxas has also starred in a recent ad, where he spoke about his father’s track record and integrity. 

Paolo, on leave from his studies at Yale University, first took on a prominent role in the campaign when he stumped for his father during a campaign rally with President Benigno Aquino III in Laguna. An Inquirer report noted that Paolo “stood out with his height, good looks and well-toned physique.” – Rappler.com