Provide your email for confirmation

Tell us a bit about yourself

country *

Please provide your email address

welcome to Rappler

Login

To share your thoughts

Don't have an account?

Login with email

Check your inbox

We just sent a link to your inbox. Click the link to continue signing in. Can’t find it? Check your spam & junk mail.

Didn't get a link?

Use password?

Login with email

Reset password?

Please use the email you used to register and we will send you a link to reset your password

Check your inbox

We just sent a link to your inbox. Click the link to continue resetting your password. Can’t find it? Check your spam & junk mail.

Didn't get a link?

Sign up

Ready to get started

Already have an account?

Sign up with email

By signing up you agree to Rappler’s Terms and Conditions and Privacy

Check your inbox

We just sent a link to your inbox. Click the link to continue registering. Can’t find it? Check your spam & junk mail.

Didn't get a link?

Join Rappler+

Join Move

How often would you like to pay?

Annual Subscription

Monthly Subscription

Your payment was interrupted

Exiting the registration flow at this point will mean you will loose your progress

Your payment didn’t go through

Exiting the registration flow at this point will mean you will loose your progress

welcome to Rappler+

welcome to Move

welcome to Move & Rappler+

[PODCAST] KRIMINAL: Why Filipinos should care about the UP-DND accord

The Duterte government shocked the University of the Philippines (UP) community after it confirmed on Monday, January 18, that it was unilaterally terminating the agreement that prevented troops from freely entering UP campuses.

The backlash was swift.

Students and activists quickly trended #DefendUP online with thousands of tweets, and condemned the militarization of the country's premier university.

They fear that the government will use the controversial anti-terror law to brand student activists as criminals and detain them without a warrant, as human rights lawyers have warned.

The 1989 accord that the government decided to scrap has protected student activists for decades. With a two-page letter, the government takes away that protection.

Why should Filipinos care?

In this episode of KRIMINAL, Rappler police reporter Rambo Talabong speaks with youth organizer Raoul Manuel of the Youth Act Now Against Tyranny to talk about the impact beyond UP's campuses of the government's abrogation.

Listen wherever you get your podcasts. – Rappler.com