medicine
ARTICLE FINDER

Simple blood test may reveal your body's inner clock

Sep 11, 2018 - 2:55 PM

Researchers have designed a blood test that can measure a person's inner body clock within 1.5 hours, an advance that may help personalize medical treatments in the future

Entering the age of human upgrades

Aug 12, 2018 - 11:00 AM

It turns out that in medicine, one key to new resurrections can be found in jumpstarting faulty, old lives

More problems found in Chinese-made heart medications

Aug 06, 2018 - 6:30 PM

Tianyu Pharm and Rundu Pharma say batches of valsartan, an active ingredient widely used in medications for high blood pressure and congestive heart failure, contained N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), believed to potentially cause cancer through long-term use

Research Check: Does drinking coffee help you live longer?

Jul 21, 2018 - 8:00 AM

Like many previous studies, the JAMA Internal Medicine paper found people who drank coffee had a lower risk of dying of any cause – and specifically, of dying from heart disease and cancer – over the course of the study

GOOD NEWS. The study contains some good news for people who drink a lot of coffee. StudioByTheSea/Shutterstock

New study confirms Dengvaxia poses more risks for kids without prior infection

Jun 16, 2018 - 12:51 PM

The vaccine can prevent 11,000 hospitalization and 2,500 severe dengue cases if given to 1 million children over age 9. But it can also lead to 1,000 hospitalizations and 500 severe dengue cases in children who had no prior infection.

DENGUE VACCINE. A health worker shows off vials of Dengvaxia vaccine administered to students during the school-based immunization in Manila on December 4, 2017. File photo by Ben Nabong/Rappler

People who walk faster could live longer – study

Jun 04, 2018 - 1:02 PM

Professor Emmanuel Stamatakis of the University of Sydney says a fast pace would be around 5 to 7 kilometers per hour, depending on a person's fitness level

BENEFITS OF WALKING. A study published by the British Journal of Medicine emphasizes walking as an easy way to improve overall health. Photo from Shutterstock

How #NoToDoctorShaming posts highlight gaps in PH healthcare system

May 28, 2018 - 3:34 PM

Netizens argue that the viral photos of nurses sleeping while on duty is a symptom of a deeper problem: the overwhelming gaps in the Philippine healthcare system

Crystals 101: Everything you need to know about crystal healing

May 02, 2018 - 8:26 PM

Xavier Cortez, who sells crystals to the likes of Nadine Lustre, talks to us about crystal healing

World's first penis, scrotum transplant done in U.S.

Apr 25, 2018 - 5:25 PM

The operation is performed on an American military serviceman who was wounded in Afghanistan

This undated handout photo obtained April 23, 2018 courtesy of Johns Hopkins Medicine shows the medical team (L-R) Drs. Richard Redett,Trinity Bivalacqua, Brandacher Gerald, Arthur Bud Burnett and W.P. Andrew Lee(R), professor and director of plastic and reconstructive surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine standing near a mannequin. Doctors at Johns Hopkins University said April 23, 2018 they have performed the world's first total penis and scrotum transplant on a US military serviceman who was wounded in Afghanistan.The 14-hour operation took place on March 26, and was performed by a team of nine plastic surgeons and two urology surgeons, JHU said in a statement."We are hopeful that this transplant will help restore near-normal urinary and sexual functions for this young man," said W.P. Andrew Lee, professor and director of plastic and reconstructive surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The entire penis, scrotum without testicles and partial abdominal wall came from a deceased donor.   / AFP PHOTO / Johns Hopkins Medicine / Handout / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / JOHNS HOPKINS MEDICINE/HANDOUT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS

#ThewRap: Things you need to know, March 29, 2018

Mar 29, 2018 - 9:15 AM

Hello! Here are the stories you shouldn't miss this Thursday.

STA. MARIA SALOME. Photo by Mavic Conde

Zuckerberg on U.S. Congress testimony, Duterte on fake medicines, PNP on PNPA beatings | Evening wRap

Mar 28, 2018 - 8:36 PM

Watch the evening newscast with Acor Arceo

Duterte to PNP: Catch makers, sellers of fake medicines

Mar 28, 2018 - 1:05 PM

(UPDATED) The Food and Drug Administration lauds Malacañang for cracking down on fake medicines

President Rodrigo Roa Duterte chats with Philippine National Police Director General Ronald dela Rosa following the ceremonial shoot during the inauguration of the Armscor Shooting Range Davao Branch in Davao City on February 26, 2018. TOTO LOZANO/PRESIDENTIAL PHOTO

Mercury Drug Foundation gives P20-M worth of medicines to AFP

Mar 20, 2018 - 4:27 PM

The donation will be sent directly to military medical treatment facilities for the immediate use of soldiers deployed in conflict areas

Alone at health clinic, Australian treats self for heart attack

Mar 08, 2018 - 12:23 PM

Experts say his extreme, do-it-yourself, MacGyver-like approach would not be recommended for most people

RITM expert: No conflict of interest in Dengvaxia study

Feb 06, 2018 - 10:54 PM

Rosario Capeding, who was accused of 'conflict of interest' during a House probe, explains clinical trials have safeguards that prevent biases in the result of the study

RITM STUDY. Rose Capeding says contrary to the allegations of a lawmaker, clinical studies are designed to avoid unintended biases. Rappler screenshot

'Why did Dengvaxia get FDA clearance without EU go signal?'

Feb 05, 2018 - 12:24 PM

A physician-turned-legislator questions why the now-controversial vaccine got a go-signal in the Philippines in the first place

DENGVAXIA ADMINISTRATION. A student from Parang Elementary School gets a shot of Dengvaxia, the world's first-ever dengue vaccine, in 2016. File photo by Ben Nabong/Rappler

After Dengvaxia mess, Duque wants more independence for FDA, RITM

Jan 29, 2018 - 9:25 PM

Health Secretary Francisco Duque III wants the FDA to be independent from the DOH, and the RITM to be free from the influence of pharmaceutical companies

CHANGES FOR FDA, RITM? Health Secretary Francisco Duque III seeks more independence for two agencies under the DOH following the Dengvaxia controversy. Screenshot by Rappler

Ombudsman orders DOH to submit Dengvaxia's clinical trial papers

Jan 25, 2018 - 3:41 PM

The Ombudsman's request stems from two complaints filed late last year against officials of Sanofi Pasteur and government officials who implemented the controversial dengue vaccination program

KIDS' SAFETY. Health Secretary Francisco Duque III hands a monitoring card to a Santa Rosa Central Elementary School student who got the Dengvaxia vaccine last year. Photo by Mara Cepeda/Rappler

Dengvaxia safety trial unfinished when vaccination program launched – Duque

Jan 25, 2018 - 2:17 PM

'So if they had waited [for] 2017, then they would have known they can’t give these Dengvaxia [vaccine vials] to children who never had dengue in the past,' says Health Secretary Francisco Duque III

MONITORING. DOH Secretary Francisco Duque III explains what parents in Santa Rosa, Laguna can do if their child received the Dengvaxia vaccine Photo by Mara Cepeda/Rappler

Enrique Ona: Successor 'solely responsible' for dengue vaccine mess

Dec 10, 2017 - 2:38 PM

Enrique Ona, Health Secretary from June 2010 to December 2014, says that despite 'high hopes' for the vaccine, they did not include it in the government's program as it was under its 'developmental' stage

NOT US. On the dengue vaccine controversy, former health chief Enrique Ona places the blame on his successor Janette Garin. Here, Ona is pictured at a press conference in Manila on October 10, 2014. Ted Aljibe/AFP

U.S. man's tattoo leaves doctors with life-or-death dilemma

Dec 02, 2017 - 12:14 PM

Consultants advise the doctors to honor the tattoo that says 'Do Not Resuscitate,' suggesting 'it was most reasonable to infer that the tattoo expressed an authentic preference'

REQUEST. A photo of the patient’s tattoo entered into the medical record to document his perceived end-of-life wishes. Photo from the website of The New England Journal of Medicine

Amsterdam, Paris to host key EU agencies after Brexit

Nov 21, 2017 - 6:36 AM

From London, the European Medicines Agency will relocate to the Dutch city, while the French capital will be the new home of the European Banking Authority

MOVING TO AMSTERDAM. The logo of the European Medicines Agency is seen on the office building in Canary Wharf, east London on May 2, 2017. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP

EU to vote on relocation of agencies after Brexit

Nov 20, 2017 - 12:36 PM

In a process only half-jokingly compared to the Eurovision Song Contest, ministers will vote on where to relocate the European Medicines Agency and European Banking Authority

MOVING OUT SOON. The logo of the European Medicines Agency is seen on the office building after the visit of Spanish Health Secretary, Dolors Montserrat in Canary Wharf, east London on May 2, 2017. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP

Duterte wants more Indian medicines available in PH

Nov 14, 2017 - 1:52 PM

The Philippine president asks Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi to invite Indian generic medicine companies to sell their products to the Philippines

President Rodrigo Roa Duterte and his partner Honeylet welcome India Prime Minister Narendra Modi prior to the start of the gala dinner hosted by the Philippines for the leaders of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) member states and dialogue partners at the SMX Convention Center in Pasay City on November 12, 2017. ACE MORANDANTE/PRESIDENIAL PHOTO

Scientists may have found a cause of dyslexia

Oct 18, 2017 - 4:20 PM

A duo of French scientists say they may have found a physiological, and seemingly treatable, cause for dyslexia hidden in tiny light-receptor cells in the human eye

In this file photo, a visitor checks through a shelf for books at the newly built Singapore's National Library 20 September 2005. Roslan Rahman/AFP

U.S. body clock geneticists take 2017 Nobel Medicine Prize

Oct 02, 2017 - 5:54 PM

(3rd UPDATE) US trio Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young win the 2017 Nobel Medicine Prize for their work on internal biological clocks known as the circadian rhythm

WINNERS. Winners of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (L-R) Jeffrey C Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W Young are pictured on a display during a press conference at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm on October 2, 2017. Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP

Nobel 2017 season opens with medicine prize

Oct 02, 2017 - 11:32 AM

Like every year, speculation is rife about the possible winners, given the number of worthy laureates in the fields of medicine, physics, chemistry, literature, peace and economics

In this file photo, a portrait of Swedish inventor and scholar Alfred Nobel can be seen on the speaker's desk at the Nobel Forum in Stockholm, prior to the announcement of the Nobel Prize in Medicine on October 3, 2016. Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP

Australian researchers say they can stop melanoma speading

Sep 11, 2017 - 10:39 AM

Researchers say a combination of new treatments can stop the world s deadliest form of skin cancer – melanoma – in its tracks and halt its spread to other organs

UNDER THE SUN. Tourists sunbathe on a beach of Barcelona on August 21, 2017. Josep Lago/AFP

No confirmed human cases of bird flu yet – DOH

Aug 25, 2017 - 1:33 PM

Health Secretary Paulyn Ubial eats fried chicken and boiled egg during the press conference to show they are still safe to consume despite the bird flu outbreak

SAFE TO EAT. RITM director Socorro Lupisan, Health Secretary Paulyn Ubial, and Bureau of Animal Industry veterinary Joy Lagayan eat chicken to demonstrate it is still safe to do so despite the bird flu outbreak. Photo by Mara Cepeda/Rappler

Against rules, Ilocos Norte advances P26M cash for meds, fertilizer, construction

Aug 23, 2017 - 8:34 PM

Governor Imee Marcos employs the same payment method she used in buying motor vehicles through local tobacco funds the subject of a House investigation

CASH ADVANCES. Ilocos Norte Governor Imee Marcos justifies her use of cash advances to buy medicines, fertilizer, and construction materials. Graphics by Raffy de Guzman/Rappler

DA: No reported animal-to-human transmission of bird flu yet in PH

Aug 11, 2017 - 7:05 PM

The health department has already sent a team to assess the workers in the areas affected by the outbreak

BIRD FLU. Department of Agriculture Secretary Manny Pinol (C), Dr Arlene Vytiaco (R), and Dr Celia Carlos of RITM, (left) confirm cases of avian influenza subtype H5 on Friday, August 11, at a press conference in Quezon City. Photo by Darren Langit/Rappler

Disease gene 'edited' in human embryos in scientific first

Aug 03, 2017 - 8:29 AM

The researchers successful use of the CRISPR gene editing tool in viable embryos was hailed as a technical feat by outside experts who called at the same time for deeper debate on the ethics of altering human DNA

'We have fish & chips': EU cities bid for Brexit agencies

Aug 02, 2017 - 7:47 AM

23 European cities launch their bids to host two London based EU regulatory agencies that will be forced to leave the British capital

LEAVING LONDON SOON. The logo of the European Medicines Agency is seen on the building housing its headquarters in Canary Wharf, east London on May 2, 2017. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP

'Government has to treat HIV as national emergency' – RITM doctor

Jul 31, 2017 - 9:27 PM

AIDS experts and persons with HIV ask government to enforce the treat all policy and provide medication to patients regardless of their infection stage

TESTING FOR HIV. A lab technician prepares samples for HIV testing. Photo courtesy Diana Mendoza

Finish your antibiotics course? Maybe not, experts say

Jul 27, 2017 - 8:53 AM

Rather than stopping antibiotics too early the cause of resistance is unnecessary drug use a team of experts writes in The BMJ medical journal

Court battle over UK baby raises ethical conundrum

Jul 26, 2017 - 8:09 AM

A 5 month legal battle over the fate of a terminally ill British baby has stoked an often angry debate about medical ethics and the courts

'SAVE CHARLIE GARD' People gather outside the High Court in support of continued medical treatment for critically-ill 11-month old Charlie Gard who is due to be taken off life support, in central London on July 13, 2017. Tolga Akmen/AFP

Israel gives medicine, equipment to crisis-hit Marawi residents

Jun 24, 2017 - 2:45 PM

The Israeli Embassy in Manila turns over the humanitarian aid to the Philippine Red Cross

HUMANITARIAN AID. Israel ambassador Ephraim Ben Matityau together with his wife Lizia Lu turns over medical supplies to Philippine Red Cross Chairman Richard Gordon. Photo by the PRC

Eurovision-style fight for UK-based EU agencies begins

Jun 21, 2017 - 1:04 PM

The European Union will kick off a battle for the right to host two London based EU agencies after Britain leaves the bloc

LEAVING LONDON SOON. The logo of the European Medicines Agency is seen on the building housing its headquarters in Canary Wharf, east London on May 2, 2017. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP

Obesity 'epidemic' affects one in 10 worldwide

Jun 13, 2017 - 7:41 AM

A total of 2 2 billion people – 30 of the world population – are believed to be either obese or overweight by 2015

MEDICAL ATTENTION. In this photo, a physiotherapist (L) assists obese patients with exercises in an obesity unit at the CHU Angers teaching hospital in Angers, western France, on October 23, 2013. Jean-Sebastien Evrard/AFP

How tobacco-chewing Bicol tribe deals with mouth cancer

May 14, 2017 - 8:56 AM

The experience of the Agta tabangnon tribe shows indigenous peoples are still left out even as the sin tax law generates a significant windfall for government


Claudia Vargas, 58, belonging to Agta-tabangnon tribesmen living at the foot of Mount Isarog, Iriga City, is one of the indigenous people suffering from mouth cancer. She is a nganga aficionado for 35 years before acquiring deadly disease due to tobacco consumption. With him is tribal Chieftain Bartolome "Lome" Oafalas. Photo by Rhaydz B. Barcia/Rappler

Epilepsy drug behind up to 4,100 severe birth defects in France

Apr 20, 2017 - 8:16 PM

The types of birth defects attributed to valproate included spina bifida – a condition in which the spinal cord does not form properly and can protrude through the skin – as well as defects of the heart and genital organs

VALPROATE AND BIRTH DEFECTS. Image of Valproate medicines from Wikimedia Commons by user Colin

Quadriplegic man regains use of arm in medical first – study

Mar 29, 2017 - 7:23 AM

The remarkable advance hinges on a prosthesis which circumvents rather than repairs his spinal injury using wires electrodes as well as computer software to reconnect the severed link between his brain and muscles

MOVING ARMS AGAIN. Bill Kochevar, who was paralyzed below his shoulders in a bicycling accident, is believed to be the first person with quadriplegia in the world to have arm and hand movements restored with the help of two temporarily implanted technologies. Case Western Reserve University/Cleveland FES Center

Free medicines for poor families available in 6 hospitals

Mar 24, 2017 - 7:33 PM

The DSWD s Libreng Gamot Para sa Masa program receives P1 billion from President Rodrigo Duterte s social fund

#InspireCourage: Ateneo doctors serve in far-flung Northern Samar town

Mar 17, 2017 - 4:02 PM

Doctors Mixie Baduria and Alfonso Regala could have gone to any specialization they wanted after graduation Instead they are serving in a 2nd class municipality in Northern Samar

LOCAL HEALTHCARE. Ateneo School of Medicine and Public Health doctors currently working in the district and provincial hospitals in Northern Samar pose for a photo in front of the Tan Memorial Hospital. (L to R) Dr Alfonso Miguel Regala, Dr Terrence Antonio, Dr Raymond Luzarraga, Dr Ezekiel Valera, Dr Sophia Caranay, Dr Sherry Mombay, Dr Merlin Sanicas. Photo courtesy of Mixie Baduria

Flipping happy: Coin swallowing Thai turtle on the mend

Mar 13, 2017 - 5:40 PM

The story of her plight and successful operation is now viral with headlines around the world The 25 year old turtle called Omsin Piggy Bank can now paddle around a small pool with relative ease

OMSIN THE TURTLE. This handout from the Faculty of Veterinary Science of Chulalongkorn University taken on March 6, 2017 and released March 7, 2017 shows Omsin the turtle being tended to by a veterinarian at the university after doctors successfully removed 915 coins from its stomach. Photo by Chulalongkorn University/AFP

Ateneo student's life-saving app bags global award

Mar 10, 2017 - 8:19 PM

Aspiring doctor Joel Alejandro and business partner Andrea Relucio win the Sandoz HACk Healthcare Access Challenge in London United Kingdom for Sali save a life app which aims to universalize CPR education and training

PINOY PRIDE. Sandoz President Richard Francis hands the prize for the Sandoz HACk Healthcare Access Challenge to Andrea Relucio and Joel Alejandro. Photo courtesy of Joel Alejandro

Weapons of mass sanitation

Mar 09, 2017 - 7:30 PM

[Science Solitaire] The indiscriminate use of antibiotics – the kind of mass cleaning we do to our insides when we are sick – is harmful not just to you but to everyone

Breaking the bank: Thai vets remove 915 coins from turtle

Mar 07, 2017 - 5:44 PM

The 25 year old turtle called Omsin in Thai underwent a grueling 7 hour surgery on Monday March 6 to remove the 5 kilogram hoard of coins

This handout from the Faculty of Veterinary Science of Chulalongkorn University taken on March 6, 2017 and released March 7, 2017 shows Omsin the turtle being tended to by a veterinarian at the veterinary hospital of the university after doctors successfully removed 915 coins from its stomach. Chulalongkorn University/AFP

Death of Lanao del Norte doctor an 'isolated case' – Ubial

Mar 06, 2017 - 4:17 PM

UPDATED The health department calls on local government units to help improve the working conditions of health workers and ensure their security and benefits

DOJ to NBI: Probe death of volunteer doctor in Lanao del Norte

Mar 06, 2017 - 10:38 AM

Reports say one of the suspects behind Perlas killing was shot dead on March 4 after attempting to escape arrest

JUSTICE. Louella Perlas, the sister of slain doctor Dreyfuss Perlas, is calling for justice.