medicine - updates

Rappler's latest stories on medicine

ARTICLE FINDER

Mobile app promises to detect child's ear infections without doctor visit

May 16, 2019 - 3:04 PM

Shyam Gollakota, head of the lab that developed the project, likens its utility to that of a thermometer, which helps people decide whether a visit to a doctor is appropriate

EAR INFECTIONS. University of Washington researchers have created a new smartphone app that can detect fluid behind the eardrum by simply using a piece of paper and a smartphone's microphone and speaker. Photo from Dennis Wise/University of Washington School of Medicine/AFP


#AskTheTaxWhiz: Documentary requirements for VAT-exempt medicines

Apr 26, 2019 - 4:00 PM

The Philippine Tax Whiz discusses the documentary requirements for VAT-exempt medicines

Don't have time to exercise? Here's a regime everyone can squeeze in

Feb 23, 2019 - 10:00 AM

Incorporating more high intensity activity into our daily routines – whether that’s by vacuuming the carpet with vigor or walking uphill to buy your lunch – could be the key to helping all of us get some high quality exercise each day

NO EXCUSES. For those of us who are time-poor, high-intensity exercise can be incorporated into our daily routines. Image from Shutterstock

DOH: Patient at RITM tests negative for MERS

Feb 20, 2019 - 9:03 PM

DOH Calabarzon Regional Director Eduardo Janairo says the patient is still under observation to determine the cause of pneumonia

Vaping twice better for quitting smoking than patches, gum – study

Jan 31, 2019 - 7:11 AM

However, an accompanying editorial in the New England Journal of Medicine cautioned: 'While e-cigarettes are 'safer' than traditional cigarettes, they are not without risks'

SAFE OR NOT? The scientific community are giving contradictory answers on the effects of using electronic cigarettes.

#AskTheTaxWhiz: VAT-exempt medicines and other 2019 TRAIN provisions

Jan 23, 2019 - 12:00 PM

The Philippine Tax Whiz discusses provisions of the Tax Reform for Acceleration and Inclusion law taking effect in 2019

Taiwan's traditional medicine stores struggle on life support

Jan 20, 2019 - 1:26 PM

Some 200 traditional medicine shops close every year as the government refuses to issue new licenses since 1998

DYING TRADITION. Traditional medicine store owner Gu Cheng-pu (L) and her father-in-law Hsu Ping-jen (R) at the family's Chinese herbal medicine store in New Taipei City. Photo by Hsu Tsun-hsu/AFP

Japan says 10 med schools altered admissions, some kept out women

Dec 14, 2018 - 7:51 PM

An investigation finds out improper school admission practices at 10 Japanese medical schools, including 4 that tried to keep women out

The emblem of the Tokyo Medical University is seen on the building's entance gate in Tokyo on August 8, 2018. A Tokyo medical school on August 7 admitted entrance test scores for female applicants were routinely altered to keep women out and apologised for the discrimination after a probe. Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP

First baby born via uterus transplanted from dead donor

Dec 05, 2018 - 9:11 AM

The breakthrough operation, performed two years ago in Brazil, shows that such transplants are feasible and could help thousands of women unable to have children due to uterine problems

Alleged distributor of fake medicines arrested in Manila

Nov 25, 2018 - 12:15 PM

P1.2 million worth of counterfeit medicines are also seized from the suspect, mostly versions of popular over-the-counter drugs

Probiotics no help to kids with stomach flu – studies

Nov 22, 2018 - 3:23 PM

Probiotics are surging in popularity, with the global market predicted to expand from $37 billion in 2015 to $64 billion by 2023

Nobel-winning therapy weaponizes immune system against cancer

Oct 02, 2018 - 1:19 PM

While chemotherapy destroys cancerous cells along with normal cells – often with toxic and debilitating effects on a patient – immunotherapy unleashes the body's immune system to target tumor cells

American, Japanese pair win Nobel Medicine Prize for cancer therapy

Oct 01, 2018 - 7:10 PM

For figuring out how to help the patient's own immune system tackle the cancer more quickly, immunologists James Allison of the US and Tasuku Honjo of Japan win the 2018 Nobel Prize for medicine

Members of the Nobel Committee for Physiology or Medicine (L-R) Edvard Smith, Anna Wedell and Klas Kaerre sit in front of a screen displaying portraits of James P Allison (L) and Tasuku Honjo during the announcement of the winners of the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, during a press conference at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 1, 2018. James P Allison of US and Tasuku Honjo of Japan won Nobel Medicine Prize for their achievements in cancer treatment. Jonathan NACKSTRAND / AFP

Blank page for Nobel Literature Prize in 2018 awards season

Sep 28, 2018 - 11:29 AM

Without the Literature Prize, this year's other high-profile Nobel is the Peace Prize, to be announced in Oslo on Friday, October 5

Researchers see encouraging results in development of TB vaccine

Sep 27, 2018 - 3:27 PM

While the results of the M72/AS01 vaccine represent a 'landmark moment,' there is still much work to be done, such as testing in a larger number of people

Simple blood test may reveal your body's inner clock

Sep 11, 2018 - 2:55 PM

Researchers have designed a blood test that can measure a person's inner body clock within 1.5 hours, an advance that may help personalize medical treatments in the future

Entering the age of human upgrades

Aug 12, 2018 - 11:00 AM

It turns out that in medicine, one key to new resurrections can be found in jumpstarting faulty, old lives

More problems found in Chinese-made heart medications

Aug 06, 2018 - 6:30 PM

Tianyu Pharm and Rundu Pharma say batches of valsartan, an active ingredient widely used in medications for high blood pressure and congestive heart failure, contained N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), believed to potentially cause cancer through long-term use

Research Check: Does drinking coffee help you live longer?

Jul 21, 2018 - 8:00 AM

Like many previous studies, the JAMA Internal Medicine paper found people who drank coffee had a lower risk of dying of any cause – and specifically, of dying from heart disease and cancer – over the course of the study

GOOD NEWS. The study contains some good news for people who drink a lot of coffee. StudioByTheSea/Shutterstock

New study confirms Dengvaxia poses more risks for kids without prior infection

Jun 16, 2018 - 12:51 PM

The vaccine can prevent 11,000 hospitalization and 2,500 severe dengue cases if given to 1 million children over age 9. But it can also lead to 1,000 hospitalizations and 500 severe dengue cases in children who had no prior infection.

DENGUE VACCINE. A health worker shows off vials of Dengvaxia vaccine administered to students during the school-based immunization in Manila on December 4, 2017. File photo by Ben Nabong/Rappler

People who walk faster could live longer – study

Jun 04, 2018 - 1:02 PM

Professor Emmanuel Stamatakis of the University of Sydney says a fast pace would be around 5 to 7 kilometers per hour, depending on a person's fitness level

BENEFITS OF WALKING. A study published by the British Journal of Medicine emphasizes walking as an easy way to improve overall health. Photo from Shutterstock

How #NoToDoctorShaming posts highlight gaps in PH healthcare system

May 28, 2018 - 3:34 PM

Netizens argue that the viral photos of nurses sleeping while on duty is a symptom of a deeper problem: the overwhelming gaps in the Philippine healthcare system

Crystals 101: Everything you need to know about crystal healing

May 02, 2018 - 8:26 PM

Xavier Cortez, who sells crystals to the likes of Nadine Lustre, talks to us about crystal healing

World's first penis, scrotum transplant done in U.S.

Apr 25, 2018 - 5:25 PM

The operation is performed on an American military serviceman who was wounded in Afghanistan

This undated handout photo obtained April 23, 2018 courtesy of Johns Hopkins Medicine shows the medical team (L-R) Drs. Richard Redett,Trinity Bivalacqua, Brandacher Gerald, Arthur Bud Burnett and W.P. Andrew Lee(R), professor and director of plastic and reconstructive surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine standing near a mannequin. Doctors at Johns Hopkins University said April 23, 2018 they have performed the world's first total penis and scrotum transplant on a US military serviceman who was wounded in Afghanistan.The 14-hour operation took place on March 26, and was performed by a team of nine plastic surgeons and two urology surgeons, JHU said in a statement."We are hopeful that this transplant will help restore near-normal urinary and sexual functions for this young man," said W.P. Andrew Lee, professor and director of plastic and reconstructive surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The entire penis, scrotum without testicles and partial abdominal wall came from a deceased donor.   / AFP PHOTO / Johns Hopkins Medicine / Handout / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO / JOHNS HOPKINS MEDICINE/HANDOUT" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS

#ThewRap: Things you need to know, March 29, 2018

Mar 29, 2018 - 9:15 AM

Hello! Here are the stories you shouldn't miss this Thursday.

STA. MARIA SALOME. Photo by Mavic Conde

Zuckerberg on U.S. Congress testimony, Duterte on fake medicines, PNP on PNPA beatings | Evening wRap

Mar 28, 2018 - 8:36 PM

Watch the evening newscast with Acor Arceo

Duterte to PNP: Catch makers, sellers of fake medicines

Mar 28, 2018 - 1:05 PM

(UPDATED) The Food and Drug Administration lauds Malacañang for cracking down on fake medicines

President Rodrigo Roa Duterte chats with Philippine National Police Director General Ronald dela Rosa following the ceremonial shoot during the inauguration of the Armscor Shooting Range Davao Branch in Davao City on February 26, 2018. TOTO LOZANO/PRESIDENTIAL PHOTO

Mercury Drug Foundation gives P20-M worth of medicines to AFP

Mar 20, 2018 - 4:27 PM

The donation will be sent directly to military medical treatment facilities for the immediate use of soldiers deployed in conflict areas

Alone at health clinic, Australian treats self for heart attack

Mar 08, 2018 - 12:23 PM

Experts say his extreme, do-it-yourself, MacGyver-like approach would not be recommended for most people

RITM expert: No conflict of interest in Dengvaxia study

Feb 06, 2018 - 10:54 PM

Rosario Capeding, who was accused of 'conflict of interest' during a House probe, explains clinical trials have safeguards that prevent biases in the result of the study

RITM STUDY. Rose Capeding says contrary to the allegations of a lawmaker, clinical studies are designed to avoid unintended biases. Rappler screenshot

'Why did Dengvaxia get FDA clearance without EU go signal?'

Feb 05, 2018 - 12:24 PM

A physician-turned-legislator questions why the now-controversial vaccine got a go-signal in the Philippines in the first place

DENGVAXIA ADMINISTRATION. A student from Parang Elementary School gets a shot of Dengvaxia, the world's first-ever dengue vaccine, in 2016. File photo by Ben Nabong/Rappler

After Dengvaxia mess, Duque wants more independence for FDA, RITM

Jan 29, 2018 - 9:25 PM

Health Secretary Francisco Duque III wants the FDA to be independent from the DOH, and the RITM to be free from the influence of pharmaceutical companies

CHANGES FOR FDA, RITM? Health Secretary Francisco Duque III seeks more independence for two agencies under the DOH following the Dengvaxia controversy. Screenshot by Rappler

Ombudsman orders DOH to submit Dengvaxia's clinical trial papers

Jan 25, 2018 - 3:41 PM

The Ombudsman's request stems from two complaints filed late last year against officials of Sanofi Pasteur and government officials who implemented the controversial dengue vaccination program

KIDS' SAFETY. Health Secretary Francisco Duque III hands a monitoring card to a Santa Rosa Central Elementary School student who got the Dengvaxia vaccine last year. Photo by Mara Cepeda/Rappler

Dengvaxia safety trial unfinished when vaccination program launched – Duque

Jan 25, 2018 - 2:17 PM

'So if they had waited [for] 2017, then they would have known they can’t give these Dengvaxia [vaccine vials] to children who never had dengue in the past,' says Health Secretary Francisco Duque III

MONITORING. DOH Secretary Francisco Duque III explains what parents in Santa Rosa, Laguna can do if their child received the Dengvaxia vaccine Photo by Mara Cepeda/Rappler

Enrique Ona: Successor 'solely responsible' for dengue vaccine mess

Dec 10, 2017 - 2:38 PM

Enrique Ona, Health Secretary from June 2010 to December 2014, says that despite 'high hopes' for the vaccine, they did not include it in the government's program as it was under its 'developmental' stage

NOT US. On the dengue vaccine controversy, former health chief Enrique Ona places the blame on his successor Janette Garin. Here, Ona is pictured at a press conference in Manila on October 10, 2014. Ted Aljibe/AFP

U.S. man's tattoo leaves doctors with life-or-death dilemma

Dec 02, 2017 - 12:14 PM

Consultants advise the doctors to honor the tattoo that says 'Do Not Resuscitate,' suggesting 'it was most reasonable to infer that the tattoo expressed an authentic preference'

REQUEST. A photo of the patient’s tattoo entered into the medical record to document his perceived end-of-life wishes. Photo from the website of The New England Journal of Medicine

Amsterdam, Paris to host key EU agencies after Brexit

Nov 21, 2017 - 6:36 AM

From London, the European Medicines Agency will relocate to the Dutch city, while the French capital will be the new home of the European Banking Authority

MOVING TO AMSTERDAM. The logo of the European Medicines Agency is seen on the office building in Canary Wharf, east London on May 2, 2017. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP

EU to vote on relocation of agencies after Brexit

Nov 20, 2017 - 12:36 PM

In a process only half-jokingly compared to the Eurovision Song Contest, ministers will vote on where to relocate the European Medicines Agency and European Banking Authority

MOVING OUT SOON. The logo of the European Medicines Agency is seen on the office building after the visit of Spanish Health Secretary, Dolors Montserrat in Canary Wharf, east London on May 2, 2017. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP

Duterte wants more Indian medicines available in PH

Nov 14, 2017 - 1:52 PM

The Philippine president asks Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi to invite Indian generic medicine companies to sell their products to the Philippines

President Rodrigo Roa Duterte and his partner Honeylet welcome India Prime Minister Narendra Modi prior to the start of the gala dinner hosted by the Philippines for the leaders of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) member states and dialogue partners at the SMX Convention Center in Pasay City on November 12, 2017. ACE MORANDANTE/PRESIDENIAL PHOTO

Scientists may have found a cause of dyslexia

Oct 18, 2017 - 4:20 PM

A duo of French scientists say they may have found a physiological, and seemingly treatable, cause for dyslexia hidden in tiny light-receptor cells in the human eye

In this file photo, a visitor checks through a shelf for books at the newly built Singapore's National Library 20 September 2005. Roslan Rahman/AFP

U.S. body clock geneticists take 2017 Nobel Medicine Prize

Oct 02, 2017 - 5:54 PM

(3rd UPDATE) US trio Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young win the 2017 Nobel Medicine Prize for their work on internal biological clocks known as the circadian rhythm

WINNERS. Winners of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (L-R) Jeffrey C Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W Young are pictured on a display during a press conference at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm on October 2, 2017. Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP

Nobel 2017 season opens with medicine prize

Oct 02, 2017 - 11:32 AM

Like every year, speculation is rife about the possible winners, given the number of worthy laureates in the fields of medicine, physics, chemistry, literature, peace and economics

In this file photo, a portrait of Swedish inventor and scholar Alfred Nobel can be seen on the speaker's desk at the Nobel Forum in Stockholm, prior to the announcement of the Nobel Prize in Medicine on October 3, 2016. Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP

Australian researchers say they can stop melanoma speading

Sep 11, 2017 - 10:39 AM

Researchers say a combination of new treatments can stop the world s deadliest form of skin cancer – melanoma – in its tracks and halt its spread to other organs

UNDER THE SUN. Tourists sunbathe on a beach of Barcelona on August 21, 2017. Josep Lago/AFP

No confirmed human cases of bird flu yet – DOH

Aug 25, 2017 - 1:33 PM

Health Secretary Paulyn Ubial eats fried chicken and boiled egg during the press conference to show they are still safe to consume despite the bird flu outbreak

SAFE TO EAT. RITM director Socorro Lupisan, Health Secretary Paulyn Ubial, and Bureau of Animal Industry veterinary Joy Lagayan eat chicken to demonstrate it is still safe to do so despite the bird flu outbreak. Photo by Mara Cepeda/Rappler

Against rules, Ilocos Norte advances P26M cash for meds, fertilizer, construction

Aug 23, 2017 - 8:34 PM

Governor Imee Marcos employs the same payment method she used in buying motor vehicles through local tobacco funds the subject of a House investigation

CASH ADVANCES. Ilocos Norte Governor Imee Marcos justifies her use of cash advances to buy medicines, fertilizer, and construction materials. Graphics by Raffy de Guzman/Rappler

DA: No reported animal-to-human transmission of bird flu yet in PH

Aug 11, 2017 - 7:05 PM

The health department has already sent a team to assess the workers in the areas affected by the outbreak

BIRD FLU. Department of Agriculture Secretary Manny Pinol (C), Dr Arlene Vytiaco (R), and Dr Celia Carlos of RITM, (left) confirm cases of avian influenza subtype H5 on Friday, August 11, at a press conference in Quezon City. Photo by Darren Langit/Rappler

Disease gene 'edited' in human embryos in scientific first

Aug 03, 2017 - 8:29 AM

The researchers successful use of the CRISPR gene editing tool in viable embryos was hailed as a technical feat by outside experts who called at the same time for deeper debate on the ethics of altering human DNA

'We have fish & chips': EU cities bid for Brexit agencies

Aug 02, 2017 - 7:47 AM

23 European cities launch their bids to host two London based EU regulatory agencies that will be forced to leave the British capital

LEAVING LONDON SOON. The logo of the European Medicines Agency is seen on the building housing its headquarters in Canary Wharf, east London on May 2, 2017. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP

'Government has to treat HIV as national emergency' – RITM doctor

Jul 31, 2017 - 9:27 PM

AIDS experts and persons with HIV ask government to enforce the treat all policy and provide medication to patients regardless of their infection stage

TESTING FOR HIV. A lab technician prepares samples for HIV testing. Photo courtesy Diana Mendoza

Finish your antibiotics course? Maybe not, experts say

Jul 27, 2017 - 8:53 AM

Rather than stopping antibiotics too early the cause of resistance is unnecessary drug use a team of experts writes in The BMJ medical journal