India OKs plan to build gravitational waves observatory

Carmela Fonbuena
India OKs plan to build gravitational waves observatory
More detectors in other parts of the world will allow scientists to study gravitational waves from different orientations

CARDIFF, United Kingdom – India approves a plan to build a gravitational waves observatory and contribute to the continuing study of the historic breakthrough in physics, a new way of studying the universe that offers to explore as far back as the Big Bang. 

An international team of scientists revealed last week the detection of the first evidence of gravitational waves, ripples in space-time that Albert Einstein described a century ago in his theory of relativity. Newly developed sophisticated instruments picked up in September 2015 the wobble created by two black holes that collided 1.3 billion years ago. 

Cardiff University professor B Sathyaprakash announced LIGO-India on Wednesday, February 17, to a packed room of students who attended a seminar on the historic discovery that he was a part of. 

“On the heel of this discovery, we already obtained additional funding. It’s not as if we put a proposal last week and got 200 million dollars, but it’s been in the works the past 5 or 6 years,” Sathyaprakash said. It was also widely reported by Indian media.

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Cardiff University scientists who played key rolein detection of gravitational waves

Posted by Carmela Fonbuena on Wednesday, February 17, 2016

 

The Indian-born professor at the Cardiff University School of Physics and Astronomy is part of the international team of scientists who worked on the US-based LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory) Project. supercomputer at the university was instrumental in examining the data coming from the US-based detectors. 

More detectors in other parts of the world will allow scientists to study gravitational waves from a different orientation. 

“This detector should help us do wonderful science not only in gravitational astronomy but also in classical astronomy,” said Sathyaprakash. 

The facility in India will cost the government $250 million, according to Sathyaprakash. – Rappler.com

Carmela Fonbuena is a multimedia reporter at Rappler. She is studying Political Communication at Cardiff University as a British Chevening scholar.

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