Provide your email for confirmation

Tell us a bit about yourself

country *

Please provide your email address

welcome to Rappler

Login

To share your thoughts

Don't have an account?

Login with email

Check your inbox

We just sent a link to your inbox. Click the link to continue signing in. Can’t find it? Check your spam & junk mail.

Didn't get a link?

Sign up

Ready to get started

Already have an account?

Sign up with email

By signing up you agree to Rappler’s Terms and Conditions and Privacy

Check your inbox

We just sent a link to your inbox. Click the link to continue registering. Can’t find it? Check your spam & junk mail.

Didn't get a link?

Join Rappler+

How often would you like to pay?

Annual Subscription

Monthly Subscription

Your payment was interrupted

Exiting the registration flow at this point will mean you will loose your progress

Your payment didn’t go through

Exiting the registration flow at this point will mean you will loose your progress

welcome to Rappler+

Adad, who kept football alive, dies at 86

MANILA, Philippines – Rene Adad, who gave Philippine football a major lift for 20 years during a barren period through the Coke Go-For-Goal program in 1983, died at the age of 86 Friday in Bacolod City.

Adad's nurse, Daisy Gevero, told Rappler in a phone interview that he died at 3:12 pm. His body was cremated at the Acropolis, Adad's daughter-in-law added. Wake had yet to be announced.

Adad's wife, Carmelia, told Rappler, that even while her husband was in frail health, he would always watch a local or international football match in television.

"He gave a lot to football through the Coke Go-For-Goal program," said Mariano Araneta Jr resident of the Philippine Football Federation in a phone interview. Araneta said Adad was a member of the executive committee of the Asian Football Confederation.

A genial man who answered his phone even as Philippine branch manager of Coca-Cola Export Co, Adad led Coke-Go-For-Goal program's inauguration in Manila in 1983, four years after it was introduced in Asia in Hong Kong by FIFA, the ruling body of world soccer.

For 21 years, Coke-Go-For-Goal brought the country's best under-16 teams in the finals. It expanded the development role played by the Boys Football Association, which was Manila-based, and filled in for the Palarong Pambansa, which resumed only in the late 1980s.

The Manila teams did not always win the Coke-Go-For-Goal finals.

"This is what kept football going through that period. We got all these kids playing the game at an early age. This was a big investment in the youth for football," added Johnny Romualdez, who took over from Adad as PFF president in 2004, in a separate interview.

When the program ended in 2004, around 300 teams were taking part in the eliminations all over the Philippines, and with the entry of the foreign-based players like the Younghusband brothers, Phil and James, in 2005, the building blocks of Philippine football revival began.

The program came after the West German government ended a five-year football development plan in 1981, two years ahead of schedule – Rappler.com