Chess

Caruana, Deac lead as So, others settle for draws in Superbet Chess

Delfin Dioquino
Caruana, Deac lead as So, others settle for draws in Superbet Chess

DRAW. Wesley So has 1 point through two rounds of the Superbet Chess Classic.

Chess.com

Wesley So forges a draw with Levon Aronian in the second round of the Superbet Chess Classic, the inaugural event of the Grand Chess Tour

Top seed Fabiano Caruana and unheralded Bogdan-Daniel Deac gained traction as six other entries, including Wesley So, settled for draws in the second round of the Superbet Chess Classic on Sunday, June 6.

Caruana, the world No. 2, trounced Romanian No. 1 Constantin Lupulescu, while Deac, a last-minute replacement and lowest rated in the 10-man field, stunned French icon Maxime Vachier-Lagrave in the over the board tournament at the Sheraton Bucharest Hotel in Romania.

All first-round matches of the inaugural event of the Grand Chess Tour ended in draws, enabling Caruana and Deac to move ahead with 1.5 points each.

So, the reigning United States champion, and new Team USA member Levon Aronian split the point after 30 moves of a Nimzo-Indian Defense and shared 1 point with Anish Giri, Teimour Radjabov, Shakhriyar Mamedyarov, and Alexander Grischuk.

Giri, winner of the Carlsen Invitational in the Champions Chess Tour, drew with Radjabov, the Airthings Masters victor.

Unwilling to take risks, Mamedyarov and Grischuk also agreed to a truce.

Showing the form that made him a world title contender, Caruana forced Lupulescu to resign in 28 moves of a French Defense.

Deac, the youngest in the 10-man field at 19, thwarted Vachier-Lagrave’s attack and forced the Frenchman to yield after 44 moves of a Ruy Lopez.

The third round will pit So against Grischuk, Deac against Mamedyarov, Radjabov against Vachier-Lagrave, Lupulesco against Giri, and Aronian against Caruana.

A whopping $325,000 (around P15.6 million) is at stake in the round-robin classical event being played over the board. – Rappler.com

$1 = P47.67

Delfin Dioquino

Delfin Dioquino dreamt of being a PBA player, but he did not have the skills to make it. So he pursued the next best thing to being an athlete – to write about them. He took up journalism at the University of Santo Tomas and joined Rappler as soon as he graduated in 2017.