WATCH: How to shift to a work-from-home life

Beatrice Go
Too lazy and can't concentrate at home? Here's a glimpse of what a productive work-from-home day can be

Even before the global pandemic that is COVID-19 and the government-enforced community lockdown in Luzon, many jobs have started shifting their systems online. This has paved the way for work-from-home set-ups to be more feasible.

As a Rappler multimedia sports reporter, there are times that I don’t have to be out on the field or at a coverage – let’s say, international games – and things can be done from the comforts of my room. 

For many good reasons, you don’t have to waste your time in traffic getting to your office. And some professionals may also have more time-consuming responsibilities at home – whether that would be cleaning your house or taking care of young children. 

It’s a glamorous idea, being productive and efficient at home. But for many of us, succumbing to that snooze button is a greater temptation. (READ: #HustleEveryday: How to be productive when working from home)

Some may not be able to help themselves from taking “breaks”; breaks that can lead to an hour of scrolling on social media and even falling asleep in bed (which I’m sure your bosses won’t take lightly on). 

On the other hand, others tend to overwork when they do tasks from home. This can also lead to mental burnout. Especially when you start and end your day (or just crash at night) doing no other thing but work.

I give you a glimpse of what my work-from-home day as a reporter can be like and how I can marry my career and home life. – Rappler.com 

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