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26% of Australian Internet users pirate content – survey

MANILA, Philippines –  A new survey released Wednesday, July 22, showed 26% of all Australian Internet users infringe on some amount of online content.

According to the Australian Department of Communications, TNS Australia conducted a survey of over over 2,630 Australians aged 12 and over for the department between March 25 and April 13, 2015.

The survey was closely based on those undertaken by the UK government for comparative purposes.

The research shows Australians are consuming a significant amount of digital content, with 60% consuming either music, movies, TV programs, and video games during the survey period.

The survey said 43% of the online content consumers they surveyed took advantage of at least some illegal content, representing some 26% of all Australian Internet users.

Why do people infringe on content? According to the survey, 55% did so because it was free, 51% said because it was convenient, 45% said because it was quick, while 35% used it as a means of trying before buying and 30% did so because legal content was expensive.

The survey also delved into what would cause people not to infringe on content. The survey showed 39% would be encouraged to stop if legal content was cheaper, with 38% also considering stopping illegal downloads if there was more content available to choose from.

The study also said that 36% would follow suit if content was released the same time as elsewhere in the world, while 21% would consider stopping at the threat of action from their Internet service provider.

The study also pointed to a lack of knowledge regarding what was considered legal and illegal content downloads, with 43% lacking confidence in what is and isn’t legal online. This number shoots up to 50% of females, and 59% among those aged 55 and up.

The report and full research information is available from Australia’s Department of Communications website. – Rappler.com

Victor Barreiro Jr.

Victor Barreiro Jr is part of Rappler's Central Desk. An avid patron of role-playing games and science fiction and fantasy shows, he also yearns to do good in the world, and hopes his work with Rappler helps to increase the good that's out there.

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