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New Inbox texting app brings privacy back

NEW YORK, USA – During the TechWeek conference in New York, held from September 29 to October 5, the makers of the Inbox Sync Engine introduced a new mobile messaging app called Inbox Messenger. 

Inbox Messenger features the ability to “un-send texts” and covers your screen texts to give you privacy. The latter is done just by shaking your smartphone.

Available for download on iOS and Android since July, the app’s release could not have been better timed. With all the recent data privacy issues swirling around these days, who doesn’t want to protect themselves?


Facebook users threatened to quit as news of the invasive features of Facebook Messenger went viral. Then, a forensic researcher claimed that Snapchat photos on Android phones were merely hidden rather than deleted

Using the Inbox messaging app to ask Inbox’s marketing lead Chris Wang, he typed, “Everything (text) is deleted. If you swipe a message, it is deleted from your phone, your recipient’s phone and from its encrypted servers, including the group conversations. Erased. Gone.”

For co-founder Hani Shabsigh, it’s a way of giving people “some peace of mind.” For uncomfortable texters, it's a reason to swipe their worries away.

Beyond the privacy issues, Wang thinks the app can help people go back to texting spontaneously based on the startup’s research findings. Where other apps tend to cram features and emoticons, this app is spare, minimalist and simple to use.

“Through its design, features and flow, the aim of the experience is to re-focus the messaging experience on conversations that people have with their friends,” said co-founder and CEO Maher Janajri in a statement.

Inbox is positioned in a fun and lighthearted way, but Wang said the company is serious about bringing privacy and the art of conversation back. If things turn out well, Inbox the App can be to un-sending and covering texts what Snapchat is to view-once photos.

Imagine a photo and text you sent or received can easily be swiped away to oblivion – deleted permanently. You know that embarrassing feeling that makes you blush right after sending a sinful text message? That will be a thing of the past. But because people are never really satisfied, the new regret may be what we delete permanently. Remember to un-send wisely. – Rappler.com

Dennis Clemente covers the New York tech scene. Visit reimaginetech.com. Follow @dennisclemente