#PiliPinasDebates2016 top worldwide Twitter trend

MANILA, Philippines – #PiliPinasDebates2016, the official hashtag for this year's first presidential debate, was the top trending topic on Twitter locally and worldwide at the time of the event. 

The debate, mounted by the Commission on Elections (Comelec) and its media partners, was held in Cagayan de Oro City on Sunday, February 21. The event proper began at 5 pm and by around 6 pm, the hashtag had zipped to the top of Twitter's trending topic boxes:

As seen on Twitter Reverb, Twitter's own visualization tool, the hashtag made significant impact during and right after the debate, from 5 pm to 8 pm.

 Also according to Twitter, the topic “Poverty, Development, and Agriculture” registered the most interest on the platform with 51% of tweets. This was followed by “Peace and Order” (22%), “Track Record” (16%), “Mindanao Issues” (8%), and “Corruption” (2%). 

The Presidential candidates’ share of voice on Twitter also changed significantly before and during the debate. The most discussed candidate was Mayor Duterte (@​RRD_Davao)​ who had the highest share of voice (43%) during the debate and also the highest jump with an 18% increase in share of voice from before the debate started. On the other hand, Senator Miriam Santiago (@​senmiriam)​, who was neck and neck for the highest share of voice with VP Jejomar Binay (@​VPJojoBinay)​before the debate, dropped 20% in share of voice to become the least discussed candidate on Twitter during the debate.  

#PiliPinasDebates2016 was also monitored through Rappler's social media analytics tool Reach

Throughout the debate proper, the most influential Twitter account using the hashtag was @inquirerdotnet, the official Twitter account of newspaper and online news portal Philippine Daily Inquirer. The newspaper co-organized the debate with GMA-7.

The second most influential Twitter accounts using the hashtag were the official accounts of other news networks and of the candidates themselves. 

Below is an overview of the Reach maps taken during the debate. The dots are Twitter accounts – the larger the dot, the greater the influence. Clumps of dots represent online communities. Lines represent the interactions between accounts. Influence is measured by Twitter impressions, or the number of times users are served your tweet in the timeline, search results, or from your profile.

As of 5:11 pm:

As of 5:40 pm:

As of 6:43 pm:

As of 7 pm:

As of 7:36 pm:

Did you use the hashtag #PiliPinasDebates2016? What did you tweet about during the debate? Share your thoughts in the comments section or write a piece on X- Rappler.com