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Twitter launches vanishing post feature Fleets

Twitter on Tuesday, November 17, launched Fleets, an option that lets people post tweets that only stay on the platform for 24 hours, similar to Snapchat Snaps or Instagram Stories.

Twitter says that the new option is designed to be an easier way to share what's on one's mind with less pressure. Based on initial tests in Brazil, India, and South Korea where the feature was on a limited rollout, Twitter said that people "feel more comfortable sharing personal and casual thoughts, opinions, and feelings.

To share a tweet in fleet mode, tap the "Share" icon at the the bottom of the tweet, and then tap "Share in Fleet." Photos, videos, tweet reactions, and text are compatible with the new feature, with Twitter stickers and live broadcasts to be compatible in the future.

"Fleets will be updated over time with new features, based on your feedback," said Twitter.

Fleets is on a global rollout for iOS and Android in the coming days. There is no word yet whether the feature will be on the desktop version as well.

Disappearing posts, some argue, are more compatible with human nature, and the flexibility of human opinions. Tristan Harris, for instance, the co-founder of the Center For Human Technology, argued that it's too easy to build a caricature of a person based on all their past social media posts, leaving them vulnerable to bullying or other attacks.

People change, and sometimes old social media posts do not reflect who the person is anymore. – Rappler.com

Gelo Gonzales

Gelo Gonzales is Rappler’s technology editor. He covers consumer electronics, social media, emerging tech, and video games.

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