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Subconscious bigotry: When you associate Muslims with terrorism

First, the Moro dude you chanced upon in life, met in school or in work and had befriended, in all likelihood has nothing to do with terrorism. And yet you may subconsciously associate him with terrorism. You probably subconsciously feel that the guy named Abdul or Muhammad selling biryani rice and kebabs in your local Middle Eastern restaurant, is probably either a trouble-maker, a no-good doer, an ill-tempered person who always gets into fights, or worse, an actual terrorist or terrorist sympathizer.