7 things I learned directing traffic until midnight

Near the end of what seemed like an endless parade of hotheads and tail fumes, I wanted to pee and was thirsty at the same time. I wanted to sit but to leave was impossible.

Believe me, I tried. Walked up to Ayala to see how bad it was, and realizing it was terrible, I thought to just raise my collar and slink away to my apartment and my cats and couch.

But what would that have made me? A coward who rages when he can, and escapes when he can.

Here are 7 things I learned manning Rufino Corner San Agustin in Makati until midnight:

1. There are some people you can help, and there are some people who are just screwed.

2. Either way, it's all temporary.

3. Most people are understanding when you impede their progress, but only when they see that you have nothing to gain.

VOLUNTEER. Carlos Garchitorena helps direct traffic at Rufino corner San Agustin streets in Makati City.

VOLUNTEER. Carlos Garchitorena helps direct traffic at Rufino corner San Agustin streets in Makati City.

4. Other people are just selfish pricks.

5. Sometimes, all you can really, really do is make sure that someone has an opening.

6. VOLUNTEERING IS ANYTHING BUT A THANKLESS JOB. People can be appreciative, and hopefully, will pass on the virtue of being a man for others. Anyway, there's always Facebook for you to tell people what you did, in the hopes that they can do the same. And that before you criticize the men who stand in our streets, in the sun, in the rain, in the smoke and the heat for 8 hours, you might stop and think whether you've done your part as the solution.

7. If you want to be better than Mother Teresa, have a bottle of water in your car, and give it to the next man in uniform who whether or not you think he's an idiot is really thirsty. (It might make his bladder burst, but he probably needs a break from that goddamn yellow box once in a while.) - Rappler.com

Carlos Garchitorena is marketing manager for the Manila Symphony Orchestra

This article was originally posted on the author's Facebook page. This article is published with permission from the author.