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Imperfect choices in a Philippine leader

Like most national elections in the country, it’s been mostly a circus with very little discussion on what direction the country should take in the future.

I know the argument. People do not want to talk about that. 

That sounds very much like "the voters don’t really think a lot" so we go down to their level of intelligence.

Boycott is not an option please. If you do that, then you do not have the right to bitch and moan for the next six years about how bad the government is.

A lot of people will have to hold their noses in this election and choose who they think is good for the country.

Sounds very much like the phrase “swallow the toad.”

Can the country survive May 9?

Of course it will or at the very least muddle through.

What gives me hope are a couple of things.

For the first time in years or even decades, there is an inflamed intolerance of corruption. That can only grow.

Filipinos are more conscious about corruption and no longer sweep it aside as part of the "business as usual" nature of politics in the country.

Next, women and a lot of men are up in arms at Duterte’s rape talk. That alone means he shouldn’t be voted as dogcatcher in the Spratlys.

More than anything else, that is why Duterte is bad for the country. Enough of this BS macho talk. We are better than that and should get away from it.

And then there is Leni Robredo. She gives the country hope. She knows she has nothing to offer but good intentions and sound policy.

She has not given up on the country. 

There is a striking sense of decency in her positions. Just look at her stand on being against burying dictator Ferdinand Marcos in Libingan ng mga Bayani.

Not like Jojo who wants him buried there or Miriam, who says there should be a referendum. Miriam’s decision blows because she is hiding behind a vote when deciding is fairly basic. Stop looking behind your shoulder at Bongbong Jr.

Robredo will be there and I hope she wins and does not change. She should be the next President in 2022. 

I hope more people like her come out and serve in public life without getting contaminated by the radioactive quagmire that is politics in the country.

More important are ordinary Pinoys. They persevere and they sacrifice inside and outside the country.

They kept the economy afloat when the country was near falling apart.

The Fab Five in the presidential derby is plain depressing. I wish the choices are better.  One day, they will be. – Rappler.com

    

Rene Pastor is a journalist in the New York metropolitan area who writes about agriculture, politics and regional security. He was, for many years, a senior commodities journalist for Reuters. He founded the Southeast Asia Commodity Digest, which is an affiliate of Informa Economics research and consulting. He is known for his extensive knowledge of the El Niño phenomenon and his views have been quoted in news reports. He is currently an Online Editor of the international edition of the South China Morning Post in Hong Kong.