Jokowi insists death penalty established law in Indonesia

Rappler.com
Jokowi insists death penalty established law in Indonesia
(UPDATED) 'My duty as president of Indonesia is to carry out the law and I’m sure other countries will understand this.'


ABEPURA, Indonesia (2nd UPDATE) — Indonesian President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo insisted Saturday, May 9, that the death penalty was a “positive law” or established law in Indonesia after the execution of 7 foreign drug convicts by firing squad last month sparked international outrage.

“The death penalty is still our positive law,” he said in English during an interview with journalists in Abepura, Papua, adding that more than 50 people die in the country every day due to narcotics. 

“Positive law” literally translates to “hukum positif” in Bahasa Indonesia, which means Ius Constitutum, or established law.

Asked about the angry reaction in other countries — the executed convicts were from Australia, Brazil and Nigeria — he insisted: “My duty as president of Indonesia is to carry out the law and I’m sure other countries will understand this.”

Australia withdrew its ambassador to Jakarta following the execution of two of its citizens, while the United Nations voiced deep regret. — with reports from Agence France-Presse/Rappler.com

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