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Ghana investigative journalist shot dead

MANILA, Philippines – Ghanaian investigative journalist Ahmed Divela was killed when two unidentified gunmen shot through his car.

Divela was part of Tiger Eye Private Investigations, a investigative journalism outlet led by undercover journalist Anas Aremeyaw Anas.

Anas, in a video posted on Twitter, said that Divela was shot thrice late Wednesday night, January 16, in Ghana's capital Accra – twice on the chest and another on the neck. Divela reportedly died on the spot.

Anas' video showed an excerpt of Ghana parliament member Kennedy Agyapong appearing on national television, calling on the public to "beat" Divela because "he's bad."

"If you meet him somewhere, break his ears. If he ever comes to this premises, I'm telling you, beat him. Whatever happens, I'll pay. Because he's bad. That Ahmed," Agyapong reportedly said.

The television report showed Divela's photos as Agyapong asked the public to beat him.

The Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) said Divela had told them "powerful figures" sought to harm him after his photos were published publicly.

CPJ said the shooting is a "grave signal" that journalists' safety are compromised when holding the powerful accountable.

"Those responsible for journalist Ahmed Divela's killing should be swiftly brought to justice. Ghana's government must prove itself willing to hold accountable those who attack the press," CPJ Africa program coordinator Angela Quintal said.

Divela worked on several investigative pieces with Tiger Eye, including the documentary Number 12 which exposed corruption in African soccer.

The probe into the graft prompted the resignation of Ghana Football Association chief Kwesi Nyantakyi for allegedly soliciting bribes and kickbacks. – Aika Rey/Rappler.com