Hong Kong dissidents

Hong Kong democracy activist rearrested on eve of sensitive anniversaries

Reuters
Hong Kong democracy activist rearrested on eve of sensitive anniversaries

Vice-chairwoman of Hong Kong Alliance in Support of Patriotic Democratic Movements of China, Chow Hang-tung poses with a candle ahead of the 32nd anniversary of the crackdown on pro-democracy demonstrators at Beijing's Tiananmen Square in 1989, in Hong Kong, China June 3, 2021. REUTERS/Lam Yik

REUTERS/Lam Yik

Hong Kong police say pro-democracy activist Chow Hang-tung had again been arrested for inciting others to participate in an unauthorized assembly

Hong Kong police rearrested pro-democracy activist Chow Hang-tung after revoking her bail on Wednesday, June 30, on the eve of the anniversaries of the former British colony’s handover to Beijing and the centenary of the Chinese Communist Party.

Chow, a barrister and vice-chairwoman of the group that organizes annual vigils for the victims of China’s 1989 Tiananmen crackdown on pro-democracy protesters in Beijing, was arrested and released from custody earlier this month for promoting an unauthorized assembly on June 4.

Police superintendent Chen Chi-cheong told a news conference that Chow had again been arrested for inciting others to participate in an unauthorized assembly.

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She was due to appear in court on Friday.

Chow could not be reached for comment.

Concerns are deepening over freedoms in the financial hub, which Britain returned to China on July 1, 1997, under a “one country, two systems” formula of government that guaranteed wide-ranging autonomy not seen in mainland China.

Critics of the government say authorities have shrunk those freedoms and are now using a contentious national security law to crush dissent.

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Officials in Beijing and Hong Kong reject those assertions and say the law was necessary to plug gaping holes in the city’s national security defenses exposed during anti-government protests in 2019.

China marks the centenary of the founding of its ruling Communist Party on Thursday, July 1, with pomp, spectacle, and what state media described as an important speech by President Xi Jinping in Tiananmen Square.

Xi, China’s most powerful leader since Mao Zedong, and the party are riding high as the country recovers briskly from the COVID-19 outbreak and takes a more assertive stand on the global stage. – Rappler.com