IN PHOTOS: Eating our way through 3 Antonio’s restaurants in Tagaytay

Rappler.com
IN PHOTOS: Eating our way through 3 Antonio’s restaurants in Tagaytay
Tagaytay road trip? Not sure which Antonio's restaurant to hit up? Here's a look at Breakfast at Antonio's, Balay Dako, and Lanai Lounge to help you decide

MANILA, Philippines – A two-hour drive away from Manila, Tagaytay is a favorite for many wanting cooler weather, a change of scenery, and an out of town food trip. (READ: Tagaytay road trip? 5 must-try destination restaurants)

Among the many restaurant destinations at the tourist spot are the Antonio’s group of restaurants – 4 restaurants owned by chef Antonio Escalante serving up quality home-cooked food.

The famed Antonio’s made it to the list of Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants 2015. On August 18, we tagged along on a food crawl to the Antonio’s restaurants with Booky to see what they were serving up. This time, the spotlight is on the other 3 Antonio’s restaurants.

Here’s a look at what we tried:

Breakfast at Antonio’s

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

Breakfast at Antonio’s is casual all-day breakfast place with all your Filipino favorites, European brunch fare, plus homemade bread, jams, custards, and yogurt.

Salmon with bagel (P245)

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

Gratinated portobello with mushroom and berry glazed duck liver (P705)

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

Fried rice omelette with beef tapa and mushroom (P405)

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

Fresh corned beef roesti (P430)

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

Housemade granola with yogurt (P150)

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

TWG Jade of Africa mimosa with passion gruit cordial and tosso prosseco (P3650/bottle)

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

Balay Dako

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

If you’re craving Filipino food, Balay Dako is the place. Aside from the usual favorites like tapa and batchoy, Balay Dako also serves up Spanish-Filipino and Filipino-Chinese fare too.

Kilaw sugba (P650)

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

 

Tapa flakes (P250)

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

Dynamite rolls (P175)

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

Oven-baked pizza (P280 to P445)

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

Batchoy (P245)

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

“Standing on the Beach” (P180)

A local whiskey, with pandan honey, herb vinegar, and rock salt.

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

Lanai Lounge

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

We didn’t get to try the food at the main Antonio’s restaurant on this trip, but we did visit the Lanai Lounge, a cocktail lounge nearby.

Pork ear salpicao (P450)

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

Pate de foie gras on Riesling poached pear with crostini (P675)

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

Tempura scallops (P450)

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

Salted cod al pilapil (P550)

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

Cheese and charcuterie (P695, P1365, P1985)

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

“Life of the Party” (P420)

A mojito evolved – Bombay Sapphire gin, ginger beer, lime, sugar, tarragon.

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

“Arugula Lemon Drop” (P420)

Ketel One vodka, sugar, fresh lemon juice, arugula.

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

Photo by Rob Reyes/Rappler

– Rappler.com

Reservations for the Antonio’s restaurants can be made through here or through Booky.

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