PAGASA declares start of rainy season in Philippines

Acor Arceo
PAGASA declares start of rainy season in Philippines
Thunderstorms, Tropical Depression Butchoy, and the southwest monsoon bring rain over a 5-day period, triggering PAGASA's declaration on Friday, June 12

MANILA, Philippines – The country’s rainy season is here.

The Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical, and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) declared the start of the rainy season on FridayJune 12.

In a statement on Friday, PAGASA noted that the following have brought “significant amount” of rain to the western parts of Luzon and the Visayas in the last 5 days:

  • scattered thunderstorms
  • Tropical Depression Butchoy
  • southwest monsoon or hanging habagat

“This satisfies the criteria of the start of the rainy season in the areas affected by habagat which will continue to experience scattered to widespread rain and thunderstorms in the coming days,” PAGASA said.

“The public and all concerned agencies are advised to take precautionary measures against the impacts of the rainy season.”

But the state weather bureau added that periods of rain will be followed by dry periods, called monsoon breaks, “that could last for several days to two weeks.” This means that rain will not persist throughout the entire wet season.

The declaration of the rainy season also comes as the Philippines continues to combat the coronavirus pandemic, a crisis that may pose more risks as tropical cyclones loom.

So far, the Philippines has had two tropical cyclones in 2020:

  • Typhoon Ambo (Vongfong) – May
  • Tropical Depression Butchoy – June

The country gets an average of 20 tropical cyclones per year. (READ: LIST: PAGASA’s names for tropical cyclones in 2020)

Below is the estimated number of tropical cyclones from June to November:

  • June – 1 or 2
  • July – 2 to 4
  • August – 2 or 3
  • September – 2 or 3
  • October – 2 or 3
  • November – 1 or 2

The estimate for December is expected to be included in PAGASA’s next climate outlook. (READ: FAST FACTS: Tropical cyclones, rainfall advisories– Rappler.com

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Acor Arceo

Acor Arceo is the head of copy and editorial standards at Rappler. Trained in both online and TV newsrooms, Acor ensures consistency in editorial standards across all sections and also supervises Rappler’s coverage of disasters.