hayabusa2 - updates

Rappler's latest stories on hayabusa2

ARTICLE FINDER

Japan's Hayabusa2 probe makes second touchdown on asteroid

Jul 11, 2019 - 2:02 PM

The touchdown is greeted with cheering and applause in the JAXA mission control room, with officials grinning and shaking hands

TEAM EFFORT. This handout photograph taken and released by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) on July 11, 2019 shows researchers and employees celebrating after receiving confirmation of Hayabusa2's touchdown on the asteroid Ryugu. Photo by Yutaka Ijima/ISAS-JAXA/AFP

Japan's asteroid probe Hayabusa2 set for final touchdown

Jul 10, 2019 - 2:20 PM

JAXA says the probe had descended around 5 kilometers and is on track to touchdown Thursday on the Ryugu asteroid, some 300 million kilometers from Earth

HARD AT WORK. This handout photograph taken and released by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) on July 10, 2019, shows researchers and employees working at a control room for the Hayabusa2 mission in Sagamihara city, Kanagawa prefecture. Photo by Yutaka Ijima/ISAS-JAXA/AFP

Japan creates first artificial crater on asteroid

Apr 26, 2019 - 9:32 AM

The Hayabusa2 probe fires an explosive device at the Ryugu asteroid early this month to blast a crater in the surface and scoop up material, aiming to reveal more about the origins of life on Earth

This handout photograph received from the Hayabusa2 spacecraft and made available by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) on March 6, 2019 shows stone and sand after bullets were fired into the surface to collect data by the Hayabusa2 spacecraft after landing on the asteroid Ryugu. Hayabusa2, the Japanese probe sent to examine an asteroid 300 million kilometres from the Earth for clues about the origin of life and the solar system, landed successfully on February 22, scientists said. JAXA / AFP

Japan probe blasts asteroid, seeking clues to life's origins

Apr 05, 2019 - 5:02 PM

The explosive mission is the riskiest yet attempted by the Japanese space agency's Hayabusa2 probe that aims to reveal more about the origins of life on Earth.

JAPAN'S HAYABUSA2 PROBE. In this handout photograph taken and released by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) on April 4, 2019, researchers and employees work in the control room in Sagamihara, before the Hayabusa2 probe starts descending towards the target asteroid. Photo by Yutaka Iijima/ISAS-JAXA/AFP

Making a dent: Japan probe prepares to blast asteroid

Apr 04, 2019 - 4:55 PM

The mission will be the latest in a series of explorations carried out by the Japanese space agency's Hayabusa2 probe and could reveal more about the origin of life on Earth

JAXA MISSION. In this handout photograph taken and released by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) on April 4, 2019, researchers and employees receive data in the control room in Sagamihara, which confirms the Hayabusa2 probe started descending towards the target asteroid. Photo by Yutaka Iijima/ISAS-JAXA/AFP

Touchdown: Japan probe Hayabusa2 lands on distant asteroid

Feb 22, 2019 - 9:34 AM

(UPDATED) 'We made a successful touchdown, including firing a bullet' into the Ryugu asteroid, says Yuichi Tsuda, Hayabusa2 project manager

FALCON. An artists rendition of Hayabusa2, or Falcon in Japanese. Photo from Go Miyazaki under CC license

Japan delays touchdown of Hayabusa2 probe on asteroid

Oct 12, 2018 - 4:00 AM

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency project manager Yuichi Tsuda say they needed more time to prepare the landing as the latest data shows the asteroid surface was more rugged than expected

Artist's impression of Hayabusa-2 probe during a rendezvous with the 1999JU3 asteroid. Image courtesy JAXA

Touchdown! Japan space probe lands new robot on asteroid

Oct 03, 2018 - 3:29 PM

The French-German Mobile Asteroid Surface Scout, or MASCOT, lands safely on asteroid Ryugu and is in contact with its team

TOUCHDOWN. This photograph received from Hayabusa2 spacecraft and made available by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) on October 3, 2018, shows the shadow of Japanese spacecraft Hayabusa2 (L) over the asteroid Ryugu. Photo from Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)'s Hayabusa2 Twitter account

Japan's space robots start asteroid survey

Sep 24, 2018 - 4:48 PM

The rover mission marks the world's first moving, robotic observation of an asteroid surface, according to the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

ASTEROID SURVEY. In this handout photograph taken and released by Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) of Japan Aerosapace Exploration Agency (JAXA) on September 21, 2018, researchers and employees work at a control room to operate the Hayabusa2 mission in Sagamihara. Photo by Yutaka Iijima/ISAS-JAXA/AFP