LOOK: ‘Ring of fire’ solar eclipse as seen from PH, other parts of world

Ming Lagman
Check out photos of the rare astronomical event here

RING OF FIRE. The annular solar eclipse as viewed at 97% obscurity from Balut Island, Davao Occidental. Photo taken at 2:31 pm by Agustin Tirona

MANILA, Philippines – Skywatchers in the Philippines and all around the world were able to witness a rare astronomical event as an annular solar eclipse graced the sky on Thursday, December 26.

According to the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration, an annular solar eclipse occurs when the moon, while at its farthest distance from the earth, enters the point in its orbit located directly in front of the sun.

This distance makes the moon appear smaller and unable to completely obscure the view of the sun, causing a “ring of fire” effect or annular – a thin crown of light around the moon.

In the Philippines, Balut Island of Sarangani town in Davao Occidental had one of the best views of the solar eclipse, where it was seen at 97% obscurity at maximum, giving viewers a full sight of the
“ring of fire” solar eclipse.

Other parts of Mindanao like Davao City also had a decent view of the solar eclipse at near-total obscurity.

ANNULAR SOLAR ECLIPSE. Photo of the annular solar eclipse as viewed from Mintal, Davao City. Photo taken at around 2:30 pm by Clent Joseph Lagroño

Meanwhile, at around 2:19 pm in Metro Manila, spectators witnessed a partial solar eclipse of at least 60% obscurity at maximum. Below are pictures from the observation station hosted by the Astronomical League of the Philippines at SM by the Bay in Pasay City. The solar eclipse ended at around 3:47 pm.

AT INGRESS. Photo of the partial solar eclipse at 45% obscurity as viewed from the observation station at SM by the Bay, Pasay City, on Thursday, December 26, 2019. Photo by Mark Ian Singson/Astronomical League of the Philippines

AT MAXIMUM. Photo of the partial solar eclipse at 60% obscurity as viewed from the observation center at SM by the Bay, Pasay City, on Thursday, December 26, 2019. Photo by Mark Ian Singson/Astronomical League of the Philippines

From General Santos City, the solar eclipse appeared from behind the clouds at around 2:38 pm and was snapped sitting right atop a station antenna.

 
 
 
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While Philippine spectators struggled with viewing the solar eclipse due to cloudy skies brought about by Typhoon Ursula, the rest of the world enjoyed an unobstructed view of the “ring of fire” solar eclipse. Below are some photos of the eclipse as viewed from other countries and at various phases of transition.

IN LAHORE. The moon begins to cover the sun during a rare 'ring of fire' solar eclipse, while an eagle flies past, at Badshahi mosque in Lahore on December 26, 2019. Photo by Arif Ali/AFP)

IN JAKARTA. The moon moves in front of the sun during the start of a rare 'ring of fire' solar eclipse in Jakarta on December 26, 2019. Photo by Bay Ismoyo/AFP

IN KUWAIT. This picture taken early on December 26, 2019, shows seagulls flying above a beach in Kuwait City during the partial solar eclipse event. Photo by Yasser Al-Zayyat/AFP

IN DINDIGUL. The moon totally covers the sun in a rare 'ring of fire' solar eclipse as seen from the south Indian city of Dindigul in Tamil Nadu state on December 26, 2019. Photo by Arun Sankar/AFP

Sighting an annular solar eclipse in the Philippines is rare, with the next viewing predicted to be on February 28, 2063.

Were you able to catch the solar eclipse? Show us your photos! Rappler.com