How to shut down a mature adult who's behaving badly? 'Ok boomer'

Published 4:15 PM, November 07, 2019
Updated 10:38 AM, November 16, 2019

Dismissing Teddyboy Locsin. "Ok boomer" has been popping up everywhere in the last two days on social media, and especially on Locsin's twitter feed.



Context: The supposedly honorable foreign affairs secretary had made a dishonorable, uncalled-for remark towards an Inquirer reporter Tuesday, November 5. (READ: Locsin slammed for blasting expletives at Inquirer reporter online)



Now, people are using that trending phrase to dismiss him.

That viral moment. A quick search will tell you "Okay boomer" gained traction Tuesday when 25-year-old New Zealand Member of Parliament Chloe Swarbrick casually swatted a heckling fellow lawmaker during her speech about climate change. Watch.

It's now the hippest Gen YZ put-down for the out of touch and close-minded adult over 50.

Ouch! If you're a Baby Boomer – born around 1946-1964 (like Locsin) – you might get a little defensive, even offended. It's an unfair slam against an entire generation based on the misbehavior of a few.

What it means: But going beyond our age sensitivities, it's the voice of the young telling us to "grow up." They want maturity and wisdom from us, and all they get is crass, juvenile, or downright stupid behavior.

Form becomes substance: It's a quick, elegant shutdown – the Millennials and Gen Z do have a flair for the economy of words. It's the perfect put-down for the old fogies of the New Zealand Parliament and some members of the Philippine Cabinet with the EQ of a 6-year-old.


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