Get the message: Signs that caught our eye during Metro Manila Pride 2018

Amanda T. Lago
Pride is a protest, after all

SIGN LANGUAGE. The LGBT community and its allies spread messages of love through signs at Metro Manila Pride 2018. Photo by Jire Carreon/Rappler

MANILA, Philippines – Metro Manila Pride 2018 happened on June 30, with the annual march seeing its biggest turnout yet (an estimated 15,000, according to organizers), with more representation from the Manila LGBT community and its allies.

As many have pointed out, Pride is not just a march, but a protest — especially since LGBT people in the Philippines still face inequality, discrimination, and violence.

The protest spirit was certainly alive in the signs that pride marchers carried as they went around the streets of Marikina, facing bad weather, and angry bible thumpers.

Through words painted on big canvases or printed out on sheets of paper, the LGBT community made sure the march was more than just about being seen, but also about being heard.

Some messages were funny, some were dripping in sass. More still were inspiring and encouraging. Some signs contained simple reminders on how to be decent human beings, while others called for action.  

Photo by Maria Tan/Rappler

Photo by Amanda Lago/Rappler

Photo by Amanda Lago/Rappler

Photo by Amanda Lago/Rappler

Photo by Amanda Lago/Rappler

Photo by Amanda Lago/Rappler

Photo by Amanda Lago/Rappler

Photo by Angie de Silva/Rappler

Photo by Amanda Lago/Rappler

Photo by Amanda Lago/Rappler

Photo by Maria Tan/Rappler

Photo by Leanne Jazul/Rappler

 

Some signs were deeply personal, such as this one, carried by a 17-year-old student Kobi Rivera, who had yet to come out as bisexual to his mother.

 

Photo by Amanda Lago/Rappler

 

Other signs were used in response to hate protesters.

 

Photo by Angie de Silva/Rappler

Photo by Maria Tan/Rappler

Photo by Amanda Lago/Rappler

 

Some signs promoted safe sex by offering quality condoms for free.

 

Photo by Amanda Lago/Rappler

 

Speaking of free things, there were a lot of free hugs to go around.

 

Photo by Leanne Jazul/Rappler

Photo by Amanda Lago/Rappler

Photo by Amanda Lago/Rappler

Photo by Amanda Lago/Rappler

 

Crafter Paula Fucoy (@crochetbuffetph) has been attending Pride and giving away handmade Pride ribbons and hugs for the past 3 years.

 

 

Why does she do it? Her answer perhaps applies to many of the other signs at Pride: “I want people to remember that they are loved.” – Rappler.com

Amanda T. Lago

After avoiding long-term jobs in favor of travelling the world, Amanda finally learned to commit when she joined Rappler in July 2017. As a lifestyle and entertainment reporter, she writes about music, culture, and the occasional showbiz drama. She also hosts Rappler Live Jam, where she sometimes tries her best not to fan-girl on camera.