Love and Relationships

[Family] Things I learned from my mom when I was 7

Fritzie Rodriguez
RAPPLER Fritz Rodriguez writes about 3 lessons her mom taught her when she was 7 years old

LESSONS TAUGHT, LESSONS LEARNED. Fritz is no longer that baby she was in this photo, but the lessons her mom taught her from when she was a child have always stayed. Photo from Fritz Rodriguez

MANILA, Philippines – Some of the best things I learned, I learned when I was 7.

I’ve always wanted a sister, but never had one. I used to complain a lot about this when I was younger. I wanted someone to tell me how it’s like to be in elementary school while I was still in kindergarten and how strange college would be while I was still in high school.

I have a big brother, I love him, but I also yearn for that “sisterly bond” my friends have with their big sisters. 

Amidst all my gripes, I almost forgot about the other girl in our home, the one I can talk to about anything and everything – my mom. 

I did not have a sister growing up, but I have my best friend, Marcie. 

Here are some of the best things I learned from her when I was 7 years old:

1) It is better to share than to keep it all to yourself. 

When I was 7, this lesson mostly pertained to food, toys and the TV’s remote control. 

“Share these cookies with your brother. Donate these to other kids. Share the remote with your dad.” 

As I grew older, I realized that this lesson applies to more than just cookies and TV hours. My 7-year-old self reminded me of this lesson 12 years after I first heard it. 

It’s better to share your thoughts and ideas with others. Keeping it all to yourself ends up in — well — keeping it all to yourself. Nobody gets to hear it or appreciate it. 

She always reminded me that being too shy will not get me anywhere. May it be a question, an idea, or anything. Just share it. 

You won’t lose anything by sharing. As more people share, more is gained. New perspectives, new adventures and new friends.

2) Don’t be too picky.

Again, my 7-year-old self applied this lesson to food. 

When I was younger, my mom would often nag me about eating fruits and vegetables. She was not too uptight, though; she still allowed my brother and I to eat snacks, even junk food; just not too much and not too often. We were kids, after all; we needed to experience a little bit of salt and sugar growing up.

My mom taught us to appreciate everything we have, may it be a grand meal or a small piece of fish. We learned to appreciate that there was food on our plates, and that somebody bothered to cook and prepare that meal for us.

As years went by, I realized that I really shouldn’t be too picky when it comes to a lot of things in life. Instead of incessantly complaining, it is better to adapt and cope with the changes around me. I cannot control my environment, but I can control my actions and perceptions towards it.

Learn to pick well, but don’t be too picky. 

3) I’m not always right.

My mom told me that my opinion matters, but so do the opinions of everyone else. 

It’s a matter of respect and diversity. There are billions of minds on Earth and not all of them will be synched to yours.

That’s the beauty of it: more opinions, more debates, more opporunities for learning.  

More than a mom

My mom is not just a mom.

She’s my mentor, movie buddy and best friend. She used to be my playmate, too, a few years back.

Aside from being our mom, she is also a mom to others, as an educator.

I’m no longer 7 years old, but I’m still always asking you questions. Thank you, ma! – Rappler.com 

 

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