Try ube mango sticky rice from this local biz

For those who love the Pinoy favorite ube as much as Thai mango sticky rice, have you ever had both treats combined? If not, check out local business Dream Foodie – they serve ube mango sticky rice, an interesting Filipino play on the traditional Thai dessert.

Dream Foodie was founded by a Filipino husband and wife (Hajjie and Aldrain Valencia), who both work as overseas foreign workers. However, when the pandemic hit, they both had to return home, without their main source of income. After a few months back in the Philippines, Dream Foodie was born – inspired by the their experiences with international cuisine and their love of kakanin.

Their ube mango sticky rice tastes like a comforting suman – the coconut-flavored sticky rice is just the right amount of chewy (but not so gooey), and so was the ube-flavored variant. The vividly purple rice's ube flavor is subtle and not so sweet, and is made with homemade ube halaya harvested from the couple's own backyard in Laguna.

The chunky slices of fresh, ripe yellow mango help pull everything together, with the tangy-sweet fruit bringing a slight acidity to the rice. But what seals the deal is the thick, fresh coconut syrup it comes with – just a splash of it adds a creamy, sweet, and tropical dimension to the dish.

Everything is topped off with sesame seeds for some crunch.

You can get the ube mango sticky rice in either solo size for P120, in medium size for P175, and in a plastic bilao for P1,200, which is good for 8-10 people.

You can even get additional cheese toppings for P20, but the ube sticky rice already has grated cheese on top, which is enough.

Dream Foodie has other sticky rice flavors in the pipeline, like ube mango strawberry and pandan mango. Currently, they also sell homemade palitaw in 10 or 40 pieces (P80, P300).

Dream Foodie can deliver from their hubs in Laguna and Pasig City. Just message them on Instagram or via phone at 09156406065/ 09282217005. – Rappler.com

Steph Arnaldo

If she’s not writing about food, she’s probably thinking about it. From advertising copywriter to freelance feature writer, Steph Arnaldo finally turned her part-time passion into a full-time career. She’s written about food, lifestyle, and wellness for Rappler since 2018.

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