LTFRB lifts Uber suspension

Rambo Talabong
Uber can operate in the Philippines again after the company paid a P190-million fine and provided compensation to its drivers

UBER BACK. The Land Transportation Franchising and Regulatory Board allows the transportation giant to operate in the Philippines once more. File photo from Agence France-Presse

MANILA, Philippines – Uber is back.

The Land Transportation Franchising and Regulatory Board (LTFRB) on Tuesday, August 29, lifted the suspension order on Uber after the transport network company (TNC) fully complied with its requirements.

Uber first paid the P190-million ($3.7-million) fine on Tuesday. Shortly after, however, the LTFRB said that the firm would stay suspended for failing to show proof that it shelled out P299.24 million ($5.8 million) as payment to its drivers for the days they were not allowed to ply the streets.

Because of this, the LTFRB resorted to asking Uber drivers for receipts of the financial aid they received, and checked 4 “samples” one by one with Uber representatives if it matched in their system.

All matched.

The transport giant was supposed to be suspended from August 15 to September 13, a total of 30 days, but it filed a petition asking the LTFRB to downgrade the penalty to a fine instead.

The P190 million came from multipying Uber’s maximum daily earnings (P10 million) by 19, the number of remaining suspension days when the LTFRB granted Uber’s petition on August 25.

Meanwhile, the P299.24-million compensation amount comes from the LTFRB taking Uber’s word that it spent P19.95 million per day to help its drivers. From August 15 to 29, Uber should have spent nearly a third of a billion pesos. – Rappler.com 

P51 = $1

Rambo Talabong

Rambo Talabong covers the House of Representatives and local governments for Rappler. Prior to this, he covered security and crime. He was named Jaime V. Ongpin Fellow in 2019 for his reporting on President Rodrigo Duterte’s war on drugs. In 2021, he was selected as a journalism fellow by the Fellowships at Auschwitz for the Study of Professional Ethics.