Which schools produce the most passers in teachers’ board exam?

Jee Y. Geronimo
Which schools produce the most passers in teachers’ board exam?
The Philippine Business for Education (PBEd) lists down 12 best performing and 22 worst performing schools in the 2014 Licensure Examination for Teachers

MANILA, Philippines – The Philippine Business for Education (PBEd) released on Monday, February 9, a list of the top and worst performing teacher education institutions (TEIs) in the 2014 Licensure Examination for Teachers (LET). 

The Professional Regulation Commission (PRC) administers the LET twice a year – in the first and third quarters.

In a new study by PBEd, 12 schools bested hundreds of others with test-taker passing rates of at least 80% for both elementary and secondary LET exams.

These are the top performing schools with at least 250 first-time LET takers:

SCHOOL ELEMENTARY SECONDARY RUNNING TOTAL
  2009-2013 2014 2009-2013 2014  
  TAKERS PASSERS TAKERS PASSERS TAKERS PASSERS TAKERS PASSERS TAKERS PASSERS PASSING
(%)
CATEGORY A
(1,000 ABOVE TAKERS)
                     
Philippine Normal University – Manila 1040 975 292 280 3707 3434 762 723 5801 5412 93%
University of Santo Tomas 497 486 142 141 1035 935 185 177 1859 1739 94%
St. Louis University 358 303 61 59 966 833 313 290 1698 1485 87%
Xavier University 507 458 124 121 398 349 137 124 1166 1052 90%
University of the Philippines – Diliman  279 277 44 44 690 664 94 89 1107 1074 97%
CATEGORY B
(500-999 TAKERS)
                     
Bohol Island State University – Tagbilaran  231 200 74 72 409 338 172 141 886 751 85%
University of St. La Salle 226 198 38 37 384 320 88 79 736 634 86%
Ateneo de Naga University 110 96 44 39 355 303 197 159 706 597 85%
University of Southeastern Philippines – Tagum  360 304 99 93 153 126 91 73 703 596 85%
De La Salle University – Manila 224 220 8 8 250 248 25 24 507 500 99%
CATEGORY C
(250-499 ABOVE TAKERS)
                     
Silliman University 87 76 43 40 174 158 69 60 373 334 90%
Saint Bridget’s College 134 111 15 14 105 91 38 30 292 246 84%

Silliman University and Saint Bridget’s College join last year’s top 10 schools. 

Poor performers

Meanwhile, 22 schools made it to the list of the worst performers in the 2014 LET. These schools have less than 20% of their students passing the exam:

SCHOOL ELEMENTARY  SECONDARY 
   TAKERS PASSERS  PASSING RATE  TAKERS  PASSERS  PASSING RATE
Pacasum College  175 27 15.43% 15  13.33% 
Sulu State College 344  39  11.34%  84  8.33% 
Cotabato City State Polytechnic College  3 0%  155  27 17.42% 
Mindanao Islamic Computer College 132  18  13.64%  31  12.90% 
Mindanao State University-Jolo 194 33  17.01%  71  11.27% 
Jamiatul Philippine Al-Islamic  76  10  13.16%  21  9.52% 
Tawi-Tawi Regional Agricultural College  129  14  10.85%  27 0% 
Marawi Islamic College  137 21  15.33%  0% 
Marawi Capitol Foundation College  57  3.51%  0% 
Jamiatu Muslim Mindanao  40  7.50%  28  10.71% 
Lapak Agricultural College-Siasi  56  12.50%  0% 
Luna Colleges  18  11.11%  20  20% 
Mindanao Capitol College  13  15.38%  0% 
De La Vida College  17 17.65% 12  8.33% 
Gani L. Abpi Colleges, Inc.  27  3.70%  6 16.67%
Mapandi Memorial College  11.11%  0% 
Lanao Educational Institute  0% 20% 
South Upi College  14.29%  0% 
Agro-Industrial Foundation Colleges of the Philippines  0%  0% 
Cali Paramedical College Foundation  0%  0% 
Southern Capital College  0%  0% 
Greenville College 0%  0% 

Two schools were in last year’s list of schools that had no LET passers from 2009 to 2013: South Upi College and Southern Capital College. (READ: Most schools for teachers perform badly in licensure exams)

Nationwide, PBEd identified 1,025 TEIs that offer an elementary education program, and 1,259 TEIs that offer a secondary education program.

The study released Monday jumps off from a 5-year study released in 2014 which analyzed the LET passing rates of the TEIs from 2009 to 2013. (READ: Know the best schools for teachers in PH)

Although the 2014 LET performance of TEIs “generally improved,” PBEd said most schools in the Philippines that offer the education program are still performing poorly.

Poor performers (below the average national test-taker passing rate):

  • Elementary LET (average: 62%) – 537 out of 1,025 TEIs
  • Secondary LET (average: 58%) – 774 out of 1,259 TEIs

Worse performers (with only 20% passing rate):

  • Elementary LET – 111 out of 1,025 TEIs
  • Secondary LET – 175 out of 1,259 TEIs

On the improvement of performance, PBEd said “only those in the borderlines between poor, average, and good performers increased their performance.”

“The worse performers, especially in the secondary LET, continue to decrease every year,” PBEd noted.

Although the organization already presented the 2014 study to the PRC and the Commission on Higher Education, PBEd President Chito Salazar lamented that no action has been done since then.

Ang plano namin, i-elevate na ‘to sa Office of the President… We we want to pressure him [na] sabihin sa PRC na ‘Ano ba? Madali lang ‘to. It’s not controversial, it’s not political, it’s not anything,” he explained.

(Our plan is to elevate this to the Office of the President… We want to pressure him to tell PRC: ‘This is easy. It’s not controversial, it’s not political, it’s not anything.’)

They recommended the following in 2014:

  • closure of programs that have consistently performed poorly for 5 years
  • a review of LET questions and the teacher education curriculum of TEIs
  • possible pre-college screening instruments or standards, such as a national entrace exam for teachers
  • availability of each TEI’s LET results to parents and prospective students
  • information on LET application forms should differentiate undergraduate degrees from the Certificate in Teaching Program for better performance monitoring
  • information from the Department of Education (DepEd) and private school associations on needed majors or specializations of teachers to better balance supply and demand

Salazar said they are already talking to DepEd to “potentially [create] hiring rules” so that public schools get the best teachers in the country.

Like last year’s study, the number of TEIs covered in the recent analysis varies from the number of existing TEIs, because:

  • LET examinees used different names/codes of schools
  • The information is based on the undergraduate degree of applicants rather than the Certificate in Teaching Program
  • Some TEIs were recently closed down by the Commission on Higher Education

To see how your school performed in the 2014 LET, you can download the complete performance table from this page– Rappler.com

Classroom image from Shutterstock

Add a comment

Sort by

There are no comments yet. Add your comment to start the conversation.

Jee Y. Geronimo

Jee is part of Rappler's Central Desk, handling most of the world, science, and environment stories on the site. She enjoys listening to podcasts and K-pop, watching Asian dramas, and running long distances. She hopes to visit Israel someday to retrace the steps of her Savior.