Comelec proclaims 51 winning groups in 2019 party-list elections

Sofia Tomacruz
Party-list group Anti-Crime and Terrorism Community Involvement and Support (ACT-CIS) tops the race, gaining the maximum 3 seats allowed in the House of Representatives

WINNING GROUPS. The Commission on Elections proclaims the winners of the party-list race on May 22, 2019. Photo by Angie de Silva/Rappler

MANILA, Philippines – The Commission on Elections (Comelec), sitting as the National Board of Canvassers, on Wednesday, May 22, proclaimed 51 winners in the 2019 party-list elections.

Anti-Crime and Terrorism Community Involvement and Support (ACT-CIS) topped the race, gaining the maximum 3 seats allowed. 

Bayan Muna came in next, also gaining 3 seats.

Six other organizations gained two seats each, while the other 43 won one seat each.

Here is the complete list of winning party-list groups, according to their rank:

  1. ACT-CIS – 3 seats 
  2. Bayan Muna – 3 seats 
  3. AKO Bicol – 2 seats 
  4. Citizens’ Battle Against Corruption (CIBAC) – 2 seats 
  5. Ang Probinsyano – 2 seats 
  6. 1PACMAN – 2 seats 
  7. Marino – 2 seats 
  8. Probinsyano Ako – 2 seats 
  9. Senior Citizens – 1 seat
  10. Magsasaka – 1 seat
  11. Association of Philippine Electric Cooperatives (APEC) – 1 seat
  12. Gabriela – 1 seat
  13. An Waray – 1 seat
  14. Cooperative Natcco Network (COOP-NATCCO) – 1 seat
  15. ACT Teachers – 1 seat
  16. Philippine Rural Electronic Cooperatives Association, Inc (PHILRECA) – 1 seat
  17. Ako Bisaya – 1 seat
  18. Tingog Sinirangan – 1 seat
  19. Abono – 1 seat
  20. Buhay – 1 seat
  21. Duterte Youth – 1 seat
  22. Kalinga – 1 seat
  23. Puwersa ng Bayaning Atleta (PBA) – 1 seat
  24. Alliance of Organizations, Networks and Associations of the Philippines (ALONA) – 1 seat
  25. Rural Electronic Consumers and Beneficiaries of Development and Advancement, Inc (RECOBODA) – 1 seat
  26. Bagong Henerasyon – 1 seat
  27. Bahay – 1 seat
  28. Construction Workers’ Solidarity (CWS) – 1 seat
  29. Abang Lingkod – 1 seat
  30. A Teacher – 1 seat
  31. Barangay Health Wellness (BHW) – 1 seat
  32. Sagip – 1 seat
  33. Trade Union Congress Party (TUCP) – 1 seat
  34. Magdalo – 1 seat
  35. Galing sa Puso Party (GP) – 1 seat
  36. Manila Teachers – 1 seat
  37. Rebolusyonaryong Alyansang Makabansa (RAM) – 1 seat
  38. Anakalusugan – 1 seat
  39. Ako Padayon – 1 seat
  40. AAMBIS-OWA – 1 seat
  41. Kusug Tausug – 1 seat
  42. Dumper Philippines Taxi Drivers Association, Inc (Dumper-PTDA) – 1 seat
  43. Talino at Galing ng Pinoy (TGP) – 1 seat
  44. Public Safety Alliance for Transformation and Rule of Law, Inc (PATROL) – 1 seat
  45. Anak Mindanao (AMIN) – 1 seat
  46. Agricultural Sector Alliance of the Philippines (AGAP) – 1 seat
  47. LPG Marketers Association, Inc (LPGMA) – 1 seat
  48. OFW Family – 1 seat
  49. Kabayan – 1 seat
  50. Diwa – 1 seat
  51. Kabataan – 1 seat

Winning groups will fill 61 seats allotted for party-list groups in the House of Representatives.

A total of 134 party-list groups ran in the 2019 midterm polls. Among those that failed to keep their seats in Congress are Akbayan and Makabayan bloc member Anakpawis.

With their exit comes the debut of other groups like ACT-CIS, Ang Probinsyano, and Duterte Youth, whose members are staunch supporters of the Duterte administration.

Duterte Youth aggressively joined the government’s crackdown against the Left as it asked students to fight leftist groups and called on the administration to revoke state scholarships of “rebellious students.” It vowed to push for the reimposition of the death penalty, which is backed by President Rodrigo Duterte.

Despite government efforts to label them as communist fronts and players in a bid to oust Duterte, Makabayan bloc members Bayan Muna, Gabriela, ACT Teachers, and Kabataan won in the party-list elections.

During the campaign period for the May polls, poll watchdogs continuously called out how nearly half of the party-list groups failed to represent the marginalized sector, which Republic Act No. 7941 or the Party-list System Act originally intended.

Throughout the years, the system has instead become a backdoor or shortcut to the House for those who cannot run in the district elections. – Rappler.com

Sofia Tomacruz

Sofia Tomacruz covers foreign affairs and is the lead reporter on the coronavirus pandemic. She also writes stories on the treatment of women and children. Follow her on Twitter via @sofiatomacruz. Email her at sofia.tomacruz@rappler.com.