health-related fact checks

FALSE: Hyssop drops can cure multiple eye diseases

Rappler.com
FALSE: Hyssop drops can cure multiple eye diseases
The Food and Drug Administration has advised the public to not apply the Hyssop eye drops to their eyes, as it may cause irritation and even permanent blindness. This product is registered as a food supplement and should only be added to food and beverages.
At a glance
  • Claim: Hyssop drops can cure multiple eye diseases.
  • Rating: FALSE
  • The facts: The Food and Drug Administration has advised the public to not apply the Hyssop eye drops to their eyes, as it may cause irritation and even permanent blindness. This product is registered as a food supplement and should only be added to food and beverages.
  • Why we fact-checked this: A Facebook post with this claim has over 480,000 views, 635 shares, and over 1,900 comments. 
Complete details

A Facebook page by the name “Hyssop Mineral drops laguna” has posted a video promoting the Hyssop eye drops. In the posted video, they show individuals applying the drops to their eyes. They’ve captioned this post: “LIBO LIBO NA ANG NATULUNGAN.👁👀🕵️‍♀️HINDI NA KAILANGAN ANG MAGASTOS NA OPERASYON. SOLUSYON SA MGA SUMUSUNOD?” followed by a list of eye diseases. 

(Thousands have been helped. There’s no need for an expensive operation. A solution to the following?)

This claim is false.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has advised the public to not apply Hyssop eye drops to their eyes. This product is registered as a food supplement, and should only be added to food and beverages. They warn that this food supplement may cause irritation and permanent blindness if applied to the eyes. 

This product is a food supplement and does not have any therapeutic claims, meaning there is no substantial evidence that Hyssop eye drops can aid in alleviating the symptoms of or cure any diseases. 

It can also be observed that the food supplement does not bear any of the warnings on the absence of their therapeutic efficacy in the post, which is a requirement for all food supplements approved by the FDA and the Department of Health (DOH). This is a responsibility that falls on the advertisers and agents of the product.

If you are experiencing any problems with your eyes or your vision it is best to consult an ophthalmologist for appropriate diagnosis and treatment. The DOH encourages the public to generally be critical of products advertised as “cure-alls.” – Renzo Arceta/Rappler.com

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